Tags: electral regulations

The electricity at work Regulations

Written by Admin. Posted in Electrical regulations

Electricity at work regulations.

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 (EAWR) places a legal responsibility on employers and employees, as duty holders, to ensure that electrical systems used at work under their control are safe.

Legal Requirementslegal responsibilities for electrical testing

To achieve compliance with the legal requirements of the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 requires proof that an electrical system is safe, which involves amongst other things, proper inspection and testing of a system by competent people and the creation and maintenance of records.

Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 is law in the United Kingdom.

Electricity At Work Regulations 1989 (EAWR)

The regulations as stated below are an overview of the UK regulations. For a comprehensive guide please refer to the latest version of the HSE document "Memorandum of Guidance on the Electricity At Work Regulations" - available from HMSO or technical bookshops.

PART I

INTRODUCTION

Citation and commencement

1. These Regulations may be cited as the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 and shall come into force on 1st April 1990.

"approved" means approved in writing for the time being by the Health and Safety Executive for the purposes of these Regulations or conforming with a specification approved in writing by the Health and Safety Executive for the purposes of these Regulations;

"circuit conductor" means any conductor in a system which is intended to carry electric current in normal conditions, or to be energized in normal conditions, and includes a combined neutral and earth conductor, but does not include a conductor provided solely to perform a protective function by connection to earth or other reference point;

"conductor" means a conductor of electrical energy;

"danger" means risk of injury;

"electrical equipment" includes anything used, intended to be used or installed for use, to generate, provide, transmit, transform, rectify, convert, conduct, distribute, control, store, measure or use electrical energy;

"firedamp" means any flammable gas or any flammable mixture of gases occurring naturally in a mine;

"injury" means death or personal injury from electric shock, electric burn, electrical explosion or arcing, or from fire or explosion initiated by electrical energy, where any such death or injury is associated with the generation, provision, transmission, transformation, rectification, conversion, conduction, distribution, control, storage, measurement or use of electrical energy;

(a) any coal mine; or

(i) there has occurred below ground an ignition of firedamp; or

"system" means an electrical system in which all the electrical equipment is, or may be, electrically connected to a common source of electrical energy, and includes such source and such equipment.

(ii) more than 0.25% by volume of firedamp is found on any occasion at any place below ground in the mine;

(b) any other mine in which-

"safety-lamp mine" means-

(a) a numbered regulation or Schedule is a reference to the regulation or Schedule in these Regulations so numbered;

(b) a numbered paragraph is a reference to the paragraph so numbered in the regulation or Schedule in which the reference appears.

Interpretation

2.—(1) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires-

(2) Unless the context otherwise requires, any reference in these Regulations to-

(a) employer and self-employed person to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control; and

(b) manager of a mine or quarry (within in either case the meaning of section 180 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 to ensure that all requirements or prohibitions imposed by or under these Regulations are complied with in so far as they relate to the mine or quarry or part of a quarry of which he is the manager and to matters which are within his control.

(a) to co-operate with his employer so far as is necessary to enable any duty placed on that employer by the provisions of these Regulations to be complied with; and

(b) to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control.

Persons on whom duties are imposed by these Regulations

3.—(1) Except where otherwise expressly provided in these Regulations, it shall be the duty of every-(a) employer and self-employed person to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control; and

(b) manager of a mine or quarry (within in either case the meaning of section 180 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 to ensure that all requirements or prohibitions imposed by or under these Regulations are complied with in so far as they relate to the mine or quarry or part of a quarry of which he is the manager and to matters which are within his control.

(2) It shall be the duty of every employee while at work-(a) to co-operate with his employer so far as is necessary to enable any duty placed on that employer by the provisions of these Regulations to be complied with; and

(b) to comply with the provisions of these Regulations in so far as they relate to matters which are within his control.

PART II

GENERAL

Systems, work activities and protective equipment
4.—(1) All systems shall at all times be of such construction as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger.

(2) As may be necessary to prevent danger, all systems shall be maintained so as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, such danger.

(3) Every work activity, including operation, use and maintenance of a system and work near a system, shall be carried out in such a manner as not to give rise, so far as is reasonably practicable, to danger.

(4) Any equipment provided under these Regulations for the purpose of protecting persons at work on or near electrical equipment shall be suitable for the use for which it is provided, be maintained in a condition suitable for that use, and be properly used.

Strength and capability of electrical equipment

5. No electrical equipment shall be put into use where its strength and capability may be exceeded in such a way as may give rise to danger.

(a) mechanical damage;

(b) the effects of the weather, natural hazards, temperature or pressure;

(c) the effects of wet, dirty, dusty or corrosive conditions; or

(d) any flammable or explosive substance, including dusts, vapours or gases,

Adverse or hazardous environments

6. Electrical equipment which may reasonably foreseeably be exposed to-shall be of such construction or as necessary protected as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger arising from such exposure.

(a) be suitably covered with insulating material and as necessary protected so as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger; or

(b) have such precautions taken in respect of them (including, where appropriate, their being suitably placed) as will prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger.

Insulation, protection and placing of conductors

7. All conductors in a system which may give rise to danger shall either-

Earthing or other suitable precautions

8. Precautions shall be taken, either by earthing or by other suitable means, to prevent danger arising when any conductor (other than a circuit conductor) which may reasonably foreseeably become charged as a result of either the use of a system, or a fault in a system, becomes so charged; and, for the purposes of ensuring compliance with this regulation, a conductor shall be regarded as earthed when it is connected to the general mass of earth by conductors of sufficient strength and current-carrying capability to discharge electrical energy to earth.

Integrity of referenced conductors

9. If a circuit conductor is connected to earth or to any other reference point, nothing which might reasonably be expected to give rise to danger by breaking the electrical continuity or introducing high impedance shall be placed in that conductor unless suitable precautions are taken to prevent that danger.

Connections

10. Where necessary to prevent danger, every joint and connection in a system shall be mechanically and electrically suitable for use.

Means for protecting from excess of current

11. Efficient means, suitably located, shall be provided for protecting from excess of current every part of a system as may be necessary to prevent danger.

(a) cutting off the supply of electrical energy to any electrical equipment; and

(b) the isolation of any electrical equipment.

Means for cutting off the supply and for isolation

12.—(1) Subject to paragraph (3), where necessary to prevent danger, suitable means (including, where appropriate, methods of identifying circuits) shall be available for-

(2) In paragraph (1), "isolation" means the disconnection and separation of the electrical equipment from every source of electrical energy in such a way that this disconnection and separation is secure.

(3) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to electrical equipment which is itself a source of electrical energy but, in such a case as is necessary, precautions shall be taken to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger.

Precautions for work on equipment made dead

13. Adequate precautions shall be taken to prevent electrical equipment, which has been made dead in order to prevent danger while work is carried out on or near that equipment, from becoming electrically charged during that work if danger may thereby arise.

(a) it is unreasonable in all the circumstances for it to be dead; and

(b) it is reasonable in all the circumstances for him to be at work on or near it while it is live; and

(c) suitable precautions (including where necessary the provision of suitable protective equipment) are taken to prevent injury.

Work on or near live conductors

14. No person shall be engaged in any work activity on or so near any live conductor (other than one suitably covered with insulating material so as to prevent danger) that danger may arise unless-

Working space, access and lighting

15. For the purposes of enabling injury to be prevented, adequate working space, adequate means of access, and adequate lighting shall be provided at all electrical equipment on which or near which work is being done in circumstances which may give rise to danger.

Persons to be competent to prevent danger and injury

16. No person shall be engaged in any work activity where technical knowledge or experience is necessary to prevent danger or, where appropriate, injury, unless he possesses such knowledge or experience, or is under such degree of supervision as may be appropriate having regard to the nature of the work.

PART III

REGULATIONS APPLYING TO MINES ONLY

Provisions applying to mines only

17.—(1) The provisions of regulations 18 to 28 and Schedule 1 shall apply to mines only; and the provisions of that Schedule shall have effect in particular in relation to the use below ground in a coal mine of any film lighting circuit (as defined by paragraph 1 of that Schedule) at or in close proximity to a coal face.

(2) Expressions to which meanings are assigned by the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 shall, unless the contrary intention appears, have the same meanings in regulations 18 to 27 and Schedule 1.

Introduction of electrical equipment

18. Before electrical equipment (other than equipment approved for the purposes of regulation 20(1)) is first introduced into any underground part of a safety-lamp mine to which the Coal and Other Mines (Surveyors and Plans) Regulations 1956 apply, the manager shall submit to an inspector a copy of the ventilation plan required to be kept for that part by regulation 9 of those Regulations, on which the intended locations of that equipment shall be shown, together with a copy of any schematic diagram relating to that part prepared for the purposes of regulation 24(1).

(a) equipment of a kind approved for that purpose;

(b) equipment approved pursuant to regulation 20(1);

(c) equipment the use of which was lawful in such zones immediately before the coming into force of these Regulations;

(d) equipment which has received a certificate of conformity or a certificate of inspection in accordance with Council Directive 82/130/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning electrical equipment for use in potentially explosive atmospheres in mines susceptible to firedamp, as adapted to technical progress by Commission Directive 88/35/EEC:

(e) equipment such as is specified in regulation 21(2);

(f) equipment which is not capable of producing incendive electrical sparks in normal use; or

(g) electrically-powered equipment not permanently installed in the mine but required occasionally for monitoring, testing, recording and measurement, and used where the concentration of firedamp is 0.8% by volume or less in accordance with suitable rules drawn up by the manager to ensure that danger will not thereby arise, which rules shall in particular include provision for personal supervision of that equipment by a competent person and testing for firedamp when it is in use;

Restriction of equipment in certain zones below ground

19.—(1) At every safety-lamp mine containing any zones below ground in which firedamp whether or not normally present is likely to occur in a quantity sufficient to indicate danger, there shall be prepared a suitable plan identifying such zones.

(2) Electrical equipment shall not be energised in such zones unless it is-and any lights which conform with this paragraph shall be permitted lights in any mine such as is specified in paragraph (1).

(a) cut off the supply of electricity to any electrical equipment situated at the place where the said concentration was detected; or

(b) (where this is not possible) take all reasonably practicable steps to make such equipment safe; or

(c) (if the taking of the measures specified in sub-paragraphs (a) and (b) above does not fall within the scope of his normal duties) report the matter to an official of the mine who shall ensure that those measures are taken;

Cutting off electricity or making safe where firedamp is found either below ground or at the surface

20.—(1) Where any person at a mine detects firedamp in a concentration exceeding 1.25% by volume in the general body of the air either below ground at that mine or at any place on the surface thereat where any exhauster in a firedamp drainage system is installed, firedamp is monitored or its heat content measured, he shall forthwith-except that the provisions of sub-paragraphs (a) to (c) above shall not apply if the electrical equipment is approved for the purpose of remaining energised in such circumstances or (in the case of a safety-lamp mine) is electrical equipment such as is specified in regulation 21(2).

(2) If the supply of electricity to electrical equipment is cut off or the equipment made safe in accordance with paragraph (1), it shall remain in that condition until the senior official on duty at the mine having determined that it is safe to do so, directs that such precautions are no longer necessary.

(3) If the supply of electricity to electrical equipment is cut off or the equipment made safe in accordance with paragraph (1), details of the time, duration and location shall be recorded.

Approval of certain equipment for use in safety-lamp mines

21.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), no electric safety-lamp, gas detector, telephone or signalling equipment or other equipment associated therewith or required for the safety of persons shall be taken or used below ground at any safety-lamp mine unless it is equipment which has been approved pursuant to regulation 20(1) or (in the case of electric safety-lamps) is of a type for the time being approved pursuant to section 64(2) of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954.

(2) Nothing in paragraph (1) shall prevent the taking or use below ground at any safety-lamp mine of any electrical equipment which was, before the coming into force of these Regulations, approved pursuant to regulations 20 and 21A of the Coal and Other Mines (Electricity) Regulations 1956.

Means of cutting off electricity to circuits below ground

22. At every mine at which electrical equipment which may give rise to danger is installed below ground and is supplied from a power source at the surface of the mine, switchgear shall be provided at the surface for cutting off the supply of current to that equipment, and adequate provision shall be made for the operation of that switchgear, including such means of communication as will, so far as is reasonably practicable, enable the switchgear to be operated in case of danger.

Oil-filled equipment

23. Electrical equipment using oil as a means of cooling, insulation or arc suppression shall not be introduced below ground at a mine.

(a) be prepared and kept in the office at the mine; and

(b) show the planned settings of any circuit electrical protective devices.

Records and information

24.—(1) Suitable schematic diagrams of all electrical distribution systems intended to be operated at the mine (other than those operating at a voltage not exceeding 250 volts) shall, so far as is reasonably practicable-

(2) Copies of such portions of the schematic diagrams prepared pursuant to paragraph (1) as are necessary to prevent danger and which show at least those parts of the electrical system which are served by switchgear operating at a voltage in excess of 250 volts shall be displayed at each place where such switchgear is installed.

(3) Plans on a suitable scale shall be kept in the office at the mine showing, so far as is reasonably practicable, the position of all permanently installed electrical equipment at the mine supplied at a voltage in excess of 250 volts.

Electric shock notices

25. Where, at any place at a mine, electric arc welding is taking place or electrical energy is being generated, transformed or used at a nominal voltage in excess of 125 volts a.c. or 250 volts d.c., a notice shall be displayed in a form which can be easily read and understood and containing information on the appropriate first-aid treatment for electric shock and details of the emergency action to be taken in the event of electric shock.

Introduction of battery-powered locomotives and vehicles into safety-lamp mines

26. No locomotive or vehicle which uses an electrical storage battery, either partly or wholly, as a power source for traction purposes shall be introduced below ground at a safety-lamp mine unless it is an approved locomotive or vehicle.

Storage, charging and transfer of electrical storage batteries

27. At any mine in which electrical storage batteries are used below ground, those batteries shall, so far as is reasonably practicable, be used, stored, charged and transferred in a safe manner.

Disapplication of section 157 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954

28. Section 157 of the Mines and Quarries Act 1954 (which provides a defence in legal proceedings and prosecutions in certain circumstances) shall not apply in relation to any legal proceedings or prosecutions based on an allegation of a contravention of a requirement or prohibition imposed by regulations 18 to 27 or by or under Schedule 1.

PART IV

MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL

Defence

29. In any proceedings for an offence consisting of a contravention of regulations 4(4), 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 or 25, it shall be a defence for any person to prove that he took all reasonable steps and exercised all due diligence to avoid the commission of that offence.

(a) any person;

(b) any premises;

(c) any electrical equipment;

(d) any electrical system;

(e) any electrical process;

(f) any activity,

(a) the conditions, if any, which it proposes to attach to the exemption; and

(b) any other requirements imposed by or under any enactment which apply to the case,

Exemption certificates

30.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), the Health and Safety Executive may, by a certificate in writing, exempt-or any class of the above, from any requirement or prohibition imposed by these Regulations and any such exemption may be granted subject to conditions and to a limit of time and may be revoked by a certificate in writing at any time.

(2) The Executive shall not grant any such exemption unless, having regard to the circumstances of the case, and in particular to-it is satisfied that the health and safety of persons who are likely to be affected by the exemption will not be prejudiced in consequence of it.

Extension outside Great Britain

31. These Regulations shall apply to and in relation to premises and activities outside Great Britain to which sections 1 to 59 and 80 to 82 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 apply by virtue of Articles 6 and 7 of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 (Application outside Great Britain) Order as they apply within Great Britain.

(a) the master or crew of a sea-going ship or to the employer of such persons, in relation to the normal ship-board activities of a ship's crew under the direction of the master; or

(b) any person, in relation to any aircraft or hovercraft which is moving under its own power.

Disapplication of duties

32. The duties imposed by these Regulations shall not extend to-

Revocations and modifications

33.—(1) The instruments specified in column 1 of Part I of Schedule 2 are revoked to the extent specified in the corresponding entry in column 3 of that Part.

(2) The enactments and instruments specified in Part II of Schedule 2 shall be modified to the extent specified in that Part.

(3) In the Mines and Quarries Act 1954, the Mines and Quarries (Tips) Act 1969 and the Mines Management Act 1971, and in regulations made under any of those Acts, or in health and safety regulations, any reference to any of those Acts shall be treated as including a reference to these Regulations.

Signed by order of the Secretary of State.

Patrick Nicholls

Electricity supply regulations

Written by Admin. Posted in Electrical regulations

   These Regulations may be cited as the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988 and shall come into force on 1st October 1988.

Application of Regulations2.—(1) Subject to the following provisions of this regulation, regulations 7(3)(a)(ii), 7(8)(b), 7(9), 9, 15(2), 16, 20(2)(b)(i) and 26 shall not apply to supplier’s works or supplies where those works were brought into use or supplies commenced prior to the date of coming into force of these Regulations and regulation 4(2) and the proviso to regulation 25(1)(c) shall not apply to any Supplier’s works brought into use on or before 31st December 1936.
(2) Where the regulations specified in paragraph (1) do not apply to any supplier’s works or supplies the provisions of the Electricity Supply Regulations 1937(1) or the Electricity (Overhead Lines) Regulations 1970(2) equivalent to the regulations mentioned in paragraph (1) (including any approvals or authorities granted or given under those provisions) in force in respect of those works or supplies immediately prior to the coming into force of these Regulations shall apply until the date specified in paragraph (3) as if those provisions had been contained in these Regulations.
(3) The date referred to in paragraph (2) is the date on which any material alteration is made to the supplier’s works or supplies in question.
(4) From the date specified in paragraph (3) the exception in paragraph (1) shall cease to apply to the extent of any material alteration referred to in paragraph (3).
Interpretation3.—(1) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—
“apparatus” means any plant, equipment, apparatus and appliances used for the purposes of generating, transmitting and distributing energy, and electric lines, fittings, apparatus and appliances designed for use by consumers of energy for lighting, heating, motive power and other purposes for which energy can be used;
“bonding conductor” means a conductor providing equipotential bonding;
“circuit protective conductor” means a conductor used for protection against electric shock which connects the exposed conductive parts of apparatus with earth but does not include any conductor which is used as a neutral conductor;
“conductor” means an electrical conductor arranged to be electrically connected to a system but does not include conductors used or intended to be used solely for the purposes of control or regulation of supply or for communication;
“connected with earth” means connected with earth in such manner as will at all times provide a rapid and safe discharge of energy, and cognate expressions shall be construed accordingly;
“consumer” means any person supplied or entitled to be supplied by a supplier but shall not include—
(a)an Electricity Board (other than in regulation 32); or
(b)in regulations 25, 27, 28 and 29, any body authorised by any enactment to carry goods and passengers by railway in respect of any supply to meet its haulage or traction requirements;
“consumer’s installation” means the electric lines situated upon the consumer’s side of the supply terminals together with any apparatus permanently connected or intended to be permanently connected thereto;
“danger” includes danger to health or danger to life or limb from shock, burn, injury or mechanical movement to persons, livestock or domestic animals, or from fire attendant upon the generation, transformation, supply or use of energy;
“distributing main” means any electric line through which energy may be supplied or is intended to be supplied by a supplier directly to only one consumer or indirectly to more than one consumer but does not include a service line;
“earth” means the general mass of the earth;
“earth electrode” means a conductor or group of conductors in intimate contact with and providing a connection with earth;
“earthing terminal” means a terminal directly connected to the supply neutral conductor at the supplier’s fusible cut-out, or automatic switching device nearest to the supply terminals;
“electric line” means a wire, conductor, or other means used or intended to be used for the purpose of conveying, transmitting or distributing energy (including to earth) and any casing, coating, covering, tube, pipe, or insulator enclosing, surrounding, or supporting that line, or any part thereof, and for the purposes of regulations 12 to 16 (inclusive) includes any apparatus connected therewith for the purpose of conveying, transmitting or distributing energy;
“Electricity Board” means an Area Board as defined in the Electricity Act 1947, the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board or the South of Scotland Electricity Board or the Central Electricity Generating Board;
“energy” means electrical energy;
“generating station” means those parts of any premises which are principally used for the purposes of generating energy;
“high voltage” means any voltage exceeding low voltage;
“Institution of Electrical Engineers Regulations” means the 15th edition of the Regulations for Electrical Installations published by the Institution of Electrical Engineers with amendments published on 1st January 1983, 1st May 1984, 1st January 1985, 1st January 1986 and 12th June 1987;
“insulation” means non-conducting material enclosing, surrounding or supporting a conductor or any part thereof and of such quality and thickness as to be suitable for the purposes of the regulation in which the term is used, and cognate expressions shall be construed accordingly;
“low voltage” means—
(a)in relation to alternating current, a voltage exceeding 50 volts but not exceeding 1000 volts, in each case measured between the phase conductors taking the square root of the mean of the squares of the instantaneous values of a voltage during a complete cycle; and
(b)in relation to direct current, a voltage exceeding 120 volts but not exceeding 1500 volts,
with any variations of voltage allowed by these Regulations;
“metalwork” does not include any electric line or conductor used for earthing purposes;
“neutral conductor” means a conductor which is, or is intended to be, connected to the neutral point of a system and intended to contribute to the transmission of energy;
“overhead line” means any electric line which is placed above ground and in the open air;
“phase conductor” means a conductor of a system for the transmission of energy other than a neutral conductor or conductor used for earthing purposes;
“resistance area” means the surface area of ground around an earth electrode on which a significant voltage gradient may exist;
“safety sign” means a sign having the symbol and text and of the design, colours and proportions specified in Schedule 1;
“service line” means an electric line through which energy may be supplied by a supplier from a distributing main but does not include a line directly from the premises of the supplier;
“substation” means any premises or enclosed part thereof which contain apparatus for either transforming or converting energy to or from high voltage (other than transforming or converting solely for the operation of switching devices or instruments) or for switching, controlling or regulating the energy at high voltage and which are large enough to admit the entrance of a person after the apparatus is in position, and includes the apparatus therein;
“supplier” means a person who supplies, and, where electric lines and apparatus used for that purpose are owned otherwise than by the person generating the supply, shall include the owner of those electric lines and apparatus;
“supplier’s works” means electric lines, supports and apparatus of or under the control of a supplier used for the purposes of supply, and cognate expressions shall be construed accordingly;
“supply” means supply with or of energy to premises other than those on which it was generated, and cognate expressions shall be construed accordingly;
“supply neutral conductor” means the neutral conductor of a low voltage system which is or is intended to be connected with earth, but does not include any part of the neutral conductor on the consumer’s side of the supply terminals;
“supply terminals” means the ends of the electric lines situated upon any consumer’s premises at which the supply is delivered and, unless otherwise agreed in writing, where a meter is employed to register the value of the supply and is directly connected to those lines, means the terminals of that meter furthest from the installation of the owner of that meter;
“support” includes stays and struts, but does not include insulators, their fittings or any building or structure the principal purpose of which is not the support of electric lines or apparatus;
“switching device” includes any device which can either make or break a current, or both;
“system” means an individual electrical system in which all the conductors and apparatus are electrically connected to one or more sources of voltage, and includes all those conductors and apparatus.
(2) Unless the context otherwise requires, any reference in these Regulations to a numbered regulation or Schedule is a reference to the regulation in or the Schedule to these Regulations bearing that number; and any reference in a regulation or Schedule to a numbered paragraph is a reference to the paragraph of that regulation or Schedule bearing that number.
(3) Words and expressions to which meanings are assigned by these Regulations shall (unless the contrary intention appears) have the same respective meanings in any document issued by the Secretary of State under these Regulations.
PART IICONNECTION WITH EARTHContinuity of the supply neutral conductor and earthing connections4.—(1) The supplier shall, in the design, construction, maintenance and operation of his system, take all reasonable precautions to ensure continuity of the supply neutral conductor.
(2) Except as required by any arrangements made pursuant to regulation 26, no fuse or automatic switching device shall be inserted in any supply neutral conductor.
General requirements for connection with earth5.—(1) The supplier shall, in respect of his works, ensure that—
(a)every high voltage system shall be connected with earth at or as near as is reasonably practicable to the source of voltage in the System:
Provided that where there is more than one source of voltage in the System the connection with earth need only be made at one such point;
(b)every low voltage supply system shall be connected with earth in accordance with paragraphs (2), (3) and (4);
(c)so far as is reasonably practicable, no system shall become disconnected from earth in the event of a fault;
(d)no conductors which respectively connect a supply neutral conductor with earth, and any apparatus used in a high voltage system with earth—
(i)shall be interconnected unless the combined resistance to earth does not exceed 1 ohm; or,
(ii)shall be connected to separate earth electrodes unless any overlap between the resistance areas of those electrodes is not sufficient to cause danger;
and
(e)where the high voltage System is connected with earth through a continuously rated arc Suppression coil, an automatic warning shall be given to the supplier of any fault which causes the arc suppression coil to operate.
(2) The supply neutral conductor shall be connected with earth at or as near as is reasonably practicable to the source of voltage and, subject to regulations 6 and 7, no other such connection shall be made:
Provided that where only one consumer is connected to the source of voltage that connection may be at some other point.
(3) Except as required by any arrangements made pursuant to regulation 26, no impedance shall be inserted in any connection with earth of a low voltage system other than that required for the operation of switching devices, instruments, control or telemetering equipment.
(4) The external conductor of any electric line comprising concentric conductors shall be connected with earth.
Multiple earthing6.  The supplier may connect the supply neutral conductor of a distributing main with earth at places in addition to that required by regulation 5(2) if, and only if, the copper equivalent cross-sectional area of the supply neutral conductor—
(a)when measured anywhere in a three-phase four wire, two-phase three wire or single-phase three wire distributing main is not less than one half of the copper equivalent cross-Sectional area of the phase conductor at the same point; or
(b)when measured anywhere in a single-phase two wire distributing main is not less than the copper equivalent cross-sectional area of the phase conductor at the same point,
and in either case is such that it is capable of carrying such loads as may reasonably be expected to occur.
Protective multiple earthing7.—(1) The supplier shall not connect or permit the connection of, or continue, a supply to any part of a consumer’s installation where the supply neutral conductor is, or is intended to be, used to connect any circuit protective conductor in that part of the consumer’s installation with earth unless he is satisfied so far as is reasonably practicable, that—
(a)his works comply with the requirements of paragraphs (2) or (3) and paragraphs (4) to (6); and
(b)the consumer’s installation complies with the requirements of paragraphs (7) to (10).
(2) (a) For the purposes of this paragraph and paragraph (3)—(i)measurements shall, where appropriate, be made along the distributing main;
(ii)in a distributing main which is divided so that it has more than one end, apart from that at the source of voltage, each such end shall be treated as if it were the only end of that main.
(b)The supply neutral conductor shall be connected with earth at a point no nearer to the source of voltage than the junction of the distributing main with the service line connecting it with the consumer’s installation which both uses the supply neutral conductor as its connection with earth and is the nearest such installation to the end of the distributing main.
(3) (a) This paragraph applies only where—(i)at least one of the consumer’s installations (not exceeding four in total) whose connections to a distributing main lie nearest to the end of the main uses the supply neutral conductor for the purpose of connecting the installation with earth; and
(ii)the distance of the furthest of those connections from the end of the distributing main does not exceed 40 metres.
(b)In any case where this paragraph applies the supply neutral conductor shall be connected with earth at a point no nearer to the source of voltage than the junction between the distributing main and the service line connecting the consumer’s installation referred to in sub-paragraph (a) above which is nearest to the source of voltage in the distributing main.
(4) The supply neutral conductor shall be connected with earth at such points as may be necessary to ensure that the resistance to earth of the supply neutral conductor—
(a)does not anywhere exceed 20 ohms; and
(b)is such that the fuses or automatic switching devices protecting the high voltage side of any transformer will operate if any fault in it causes the low voltage side to become charged at a higher voltage unless the high voltage side of that transformer is connected with earth through a continuously rated arc suppression coil.
(5) The supply neutral conductor shall have a copper equivalent cross-sectional area which satisfies the requirements of regulation 6.
(6) Any connection with earth required by this regulation may be made by connecting the supply neutral conductor to the supply neutral conductor of another distributing main.
(7) Any metalwork on the consumer’s premises which—
(a)is in, or may reasonably be expected to come into electrical contact with earth;
and
(b)is so situated that any person, livestock or domestic animal could simultaneously touch—
(i)any such metalwork, or any metalwork in electrical contact therewith; and
(ii)any exposed metalwork forming part of the consumer’s installation but not normally carrying an electric current, or any metalwork in electrical contact therewith,
shall be connected to the earthing terminal.
(8) Where paragraph (7) applies—
(a)every circuit protective conductor in the part of the consumer’s installation described in paragraph (1) shall be connected to the earthing terminal mentioned in paragraph (7);
(b)the connection required by paragraph (7) shall be made by means of a bonding conductor attached in such a way as to avoid, so far as is reasonably practicable, electrolytic action at the point of connection; and
(c)where the bonding conductor is attached to a pipe or metalwork entering a building or Structure that connection shall be made as near to the point of entry as is reasonably practicable for the purpose of avoiding the risk of electric shock.
(9) The minimum copper equivalent cross-sectional area of any bonding conductor shall not be less than the figure shown in column 2 of the Table set out below in respect of any supply neutral conductor the corresponding copper equivalent cross-sectional area of which is shown in column 1.
TableColumn 1Column 2Copper equivalent cross-sectional area of supply neutral conductorMinimum copper equivalent cross-sectional area of bonding conductor35 sq mm or less10 sq mmover 35 sq mm but not more than 50 sq mm16 sq mmover 50 sq mm but not more than 95 sq mm25 sq mmover 95 sq mm but not more than 150 sq mm35 sq mmover 150 sq mm50 sq mm(10) The supply neutral conductor shall not be connected electrically to any metalwork in any caravan or boat.
Earthing of metalwork8.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), and without prejudice to any other requirement as to earthing, any metalwork enclosing, supporting or otherwise associated with a supplier’s works and which is not intended to serve as a phase conductor shall, where necessary to prevent danger, be connected with earth.
(2) Paragraph (1) shall not apply—
(a)to any metalwork attached to, or forming part of, a wooden pole support the design and construction of which are such as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger within three metres of the ground from any failure of insulation; or
(b)to any wall-mounted metal bracket carrying an overhead line not connected with earth where the line is both supported by an insulator and the part of the line in contact with the insulator is itself surrounded by insulation.
PART IIIELECTRIC LINES BELOW GROUNDGeneral restriction9.  No supplier shall knowingly Supply through electric lines placed below ground (except those in generating stations and substations under the control of the supplier or forming part of a consumer’s installation) which do not comply with this Part of these Regulations.
Protective screens10.—(1) Conductors which are placed below ground and are not connected with earth shall be insulated from earth otherwise than by a support and protected in accordance with paragraph (2).
(2) The protection referred to in paragraph (1) shall comprise—
(a)in respect of joints or terminations of a conductor in a low voltage system, some form of mechanical protection; and
(b)in respect of any other part of any conductor, an electrically continuous metallic screen connected with earth,
so placed as to ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, any tool or device likely to be used in the vicinity shall make contact with that protection or screen before it can make contact with that conductor.
(3) A supply neutral conductor may be combined in a single device or arrangement with either or both of—
(a)a metallic screen or armouring;
(b)other protective material.
Excavations11.—(1) Every conductor below ground shall be placed at such depth as to avoid, so far as is reasonably practicable, any damage or danger by reason of such uses of the land which can reasonably be expected when the conductor is placed below ground.
(2) In addition to satisfying the requirements of paragraph (1), a conductor below ground used in a supplier’s high voltage system but not connected with earth shall be laid in such manner (whether in pipes or ducts or so overlaid at such a distance above the conductor by protective tiles or warning tape or Some other protective or warning device or otherwise) as to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that any person excavating the ground above the conductor will receive a warning of its presence.
PART IVELECTRIC LINES PLACED ABOVE GROUNDRestriction on placing electric lines above ground12.  No supplier shall knowingly use any electric lines, wires, cables or supports above ground (except those in a generating station or substation or forming part of a consumer’s installation) which do not comply with this Part of these Regulations.
Minimum height of overhead lines, wires and cables13.—(1) Subject to paragraph (3), the height above ground of any overhead line, or a wire or cable attached to a support carrying any overhead line, at the maximum likely temperature of that line, shall not be less than that specified in this regulation.
(2) In relation to an overhead line used, or intended to be used, at a voltage specified in column 1 of Schedule 2 the height referred to in paragraph (1) shall be—
(a)at any point where that line is over a road accessible to vehicular traffic, the height specified in column 2 of Schedule 2 as appropriate to that voltage; and
(b)at any other point, the height specified in column 3 of Schedule 2 as appropriate to that voltage.
(3) This regulation does not apply to any overhead line at a point where it is not over a road accessible to vehicular traffic and which—
(a)is surrounded by insulation; or
(b)is not surrounded by insulation and is at least 4.3 metres above ground and connects apparatus mounted on a support to any overhead line; or
(c)is connected with earth.
(4) The height above ground of any wire or cable which is attached to a support carrying any overhead line shall not, at its likely maximum temperature, be less than 5.8 metres at any point where it is over any road accessible to vehicular traffic.
(5) Every overhead line shall be so placed that it shall not, so far as is reasonably practicable, come so close to any building, tree or structure as to cause danger.
Position, insulation and protection of electric lines14.—(1) For the purposes of this regulation an electric line placed above ground which is connected to any source of voltage shall be considered to be ordinarily accessible if and so long as it may be reached by hand from any scaffolding, ladder or other construction erected or placed on, in, against or near to a building or structure, but shall not be considered to be so accessible during such reasonable period during and after the erection or placing as may be necessary to arrange for the protection of that line if that was the purpose, or part of the purpose, of the erection or placing.
(2) Any part of an electric line placed above ground which is not connected with earth and which is not ordinarily accessible shall be insulated.
(3) Any part of an electric line placed above ground which is not connected with earth and which is ordinarily accessible shall be—
(a)made dead; or
(b)so insulated that it is protected, so far as is reasonably practicable, against mechanical damage or interference; or
(c)adequately protected to prevent danger.
(4) Any bare low voltage electric line placed above ground which is not connected with earth shall be situated, throughout its length, vertically above a bare electric line which is connected with earth.
(5) Nothing in this regulation shall require the supplier to insulate or protect any part of any electric line placed above ground which, but for the provisions of paragraph (1), would not be required to be insulated or protected unless—
(a)he has been given reasonable notice of the erection of the building or structure which would cause that line to become accessible; and
(b)unless otherwise agreed, the person responsible for the erection of that building or Structure which would cause that line to become accessible Shall have paid, or undertaken to pay, the reasonable cost of the insulation of the line.
(6) Nothing in this regulation shall be taken to allow the application of temporary insulation to any electric line other than a low voltage line.
Precautions against access15.—(1) Every support carrying a high voltage overhead line shall, if the circumstances reasonably require, be fitted with devices to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any unauthorised person from reaching a position at which any such line would be a source of danger.
(2) The supplier shall attach and keep attached safety signs to supports carrying a high voltage overhead line of such size and placed in such positions as are necessary to give due warning of danger in all the circumstances.
Insulators in stay wires16.  Every stay wire which forms part of or is attached to any support carrying a bare live electric line shall be fitted with an insulator no part of which shall be less than 3 metres above ground or above the normal height of any such line attached to that support.
PART VSUPPLIER'S WORKSSufficiency of supplier’s works17.  All supplier’s works shall be sufficient for the purposes for, and the circumstances in, which they are used and so constructed, installed, protected (both electrically and mechanically), used, and maintained as to prevent danger or interruption of supply so far as is reasonably practicable.
Maximum voltage18.  No electric line shall be used for the purpose of supply at a voltage greater than 440,000 volts.
Enclosed spaces19.  The supplier shall take precautions to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger due to the influx of water or any noxious or explosive liquid or gas into any enclosed space containing his works.
High voltage: additional provisions20.—(1) Paragraphs (2) and (3) shall apply only to supplier’s works where energy at high voltage is generated, transformed, converted, regulated, switched or controlled.
(2) The supplier shall—
(a)enclose any part of a substation in the open air, containing live apparatus which is not encased, by a fence not less than 2.4 metres high to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger or unauthorised access;
(b)ensure that, So far as is reasonably practicable, there are at all times displayed in a conspicuous position—
(i)subject to paragraph (3), a safety sign and a notice giving the name of the supplier and an address or telephone number where a person appointed by the supplier will be in constant attendance, and
(ii)such other signs as may be necessary to give warning of danger having regard, inter alia, to the siting of, the nature of, and the measures taken to ensure the physical security of, the supplier’s works; and
(c)take all reasonable precautions to minimise the risk of fire.
(3) The provisions of paragraph (2)(b)(i) shall not apply to any exposed live parts of the supplier’s works which are held at least 4.3 metres above ground by a support, or to any insulated electric line attached to that support.
Protective measures21.  The supplier shall apply protective devices to every system which will, so far as is reasonably practicable, prevent any current, including leakage to earth, from flowing in any part of a system for such a period that that part of the system can no longer carry that current without danger.
Precautions against excess voltage22.  The supplier shall make arrangements which ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that—
(a)every low voltage electric line shall be protected against danger arising from accidental contact with or leakage from any high voltage electric line; and
(b)where energy at a higher voltage is transformed no danger shall be caused as a result of a system at a lower voltage becoming charged above its normal voltage by leakage from or contact with the supplier’s system at the higher voltage.
Precautions against supply failure23.—(1) The supplier’s works shall be so arranged, and provided where necessary with fusible cut-outs or automatic switching devices so located as to restrict, so far as is reasonably practicable, the number of consumers affected by any fault in the supplier’s works.
(2) The supplier shall at all times take all reasonably practicable steps to avoid interruptions of supply resulting from his own acts.
Inspection of supplier’s works24.  The supplier shall take all reasonably practicable steps to inspect his installations and works to ensure compliance with these Regulations.
PART VISUPPLY TO CONSUMER'S INSTALLATIONSSupplier’s works on consumer’s premises25.—(1) The supplier shall ensure that all his works on a consumer’s premises which are not under the control of the consumer (whether forming part of the consumer’s installation or not) are—
(a)suitable for their respective purposes;
(b)installed and, so far as is reasonably practicable, maintained so as to prevent danger: and
(c)protected, so far as is reasonably practicable, by a suitable fusible cut-out or automatic switching device as close as reasonably practicable to the supply terminals.
Provided that no such fusible cut-out or automatic switching device shall be inserted in any conductor connected with earth.
(2) The standard of construction and installation to be adopted in complying with paragraph (1) shall not be lower than that imposed by regulation 27.
(3) Every cut-out or automatic switching device mentioned in paragraph (1)(c) on premises not under the supplier’s control shall be enclosed in a locked or sealed container.
(4) Any electric line which forms part of the supplier’s works and which is taken into a building at a point below the level of the ground shall be so installed as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, the influx of any noxious or explosive liquid or gas at the point of entry.
(5) The supplier shall mark permanently the separate conductors of electric lines connected to supply terminals as close as practicable to those terminals to show the polarity of each conductor and, where appropriate, phase rotation.
Interconnected supplies26.  No person shall knowingly provide energy to his own or any consumer’s installation or allow any electric lines in his ownership or under his control to be used for that purpose if that installation may also be supplied from an alternative source of energy unless he satisfies the requirements of Part I or Part II of Schedule 3.
General conditions as to consumers27.—(1) No supplier shall be compelled to commence or, subject to regulation 28, to continue to give a supply to any consumer unless he is reasonably satisfied that each part of the consumer’s installation is so constructed, installed, protected and used, so far as is reasonably practicable, as to prevent danger and not to cause undue interference with the supplier’s system or with the supply to others.
(2) Any consumer’s installation which complies with the provisions of the Institution of Electrical Engineers Regulations shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of this regulation as to safety.
Discontinuance of supply in certain circumstances28.—(1) Where a supplier, after making such examination as the circumstances permit, has reasonable grounds for supposing that a consumer’s installation or any part of it, including any supplier’s works situated on the consumer’s side of the supply terminals, fails to fulfil any relevant requirement of regulation 27, paragraphs (2) to (7) shall apply.
(2) Where, in an emergency, the supplier is satisfied that immediate action is justified in the interests of safety, he may without prior notice discontinue the supply to the consumer’s installation and notice in writing of the disconnection and the reasons for it shall be given to the consumer as soon as is reasonably practicable.
(3) Subject to paragraph (2), the supplier may, by notice in writing specifying the grounds, require the consumer within such reasonable time as the notice shall specify to comply with one or both of the following—
(a)to permit a person duly authorised by the supplier in writing to inspect and test the consumer’s installation or any part of it at a reasonable time;
(b)to take, or desist from, such action as may be necessary to correct or avoid undue interference with the supplier’s supply or apparatus or with the supply to, or the apparatus of, other consumers.
(4) In any of the circumstances specified in paragraph (5) the supplier may, on the expiry of the period specified in the notice referred to in paragraph (3), discontinue the supply to the consumer’s installation and shall give immediate notice in writing to the consumer of the discontinuance.
(5) The circumstances referred to in paragraph (4) are—
(a)that, after service of a notice under paragraph (3)(a), the consumer does not give facilities for inspection or testing; or
(b)in any Other case—
(i)after any such test or inspection the person authorised makes a report confirming that the consumer’s installation (or any part of it) fails to fulfil any relevant requirement of regulation 27; or
(ii)the consumer fails to show to the reasonable satisfaction of the supplier within the period so required that the matter complained of has been remedied or is the responsibility of the supplier.
(6) Any difference between the consumer and the supplier in relation to the grounds or the period specified in any notice of the kind mentioned in paragraph (3)(b) shall be determined in the manner provided by regulation 29.
(7) The supplier shall not discontinue the supply in pursuance of paragraph (4) pending the determination of any difference of the kind mentioned in paragraph (6), and shall not discontinue the supply to the whole of the consumer s installation where it is reasonable to disconnect only a portion of that installation in respect of which complaint is made.
(8) Where in pursuance of this regulation a supplier has disconnected the supply to a consumer’s installation (or any part of it) the supplier shall not recommence the supply unless—
(a)he is satisfied in respect of the consumer’s installation that the relevant requirements of regulation 27 have been fulfilled; or
(b)it has been determined in the manner provided by regulation 29 that the supplier is not entitled under regulation 27 to decline to recommence the supply,
and if he is so satisfied or it is so determined, the supplier shall forthwith recommence the supply.
Notices and determination of differences29.—(1) In any case where the supplier in pursuance of these Regulations declines—
(a)to connect a consumer’s installation or any part of it with his electric lines; or
(b)to commence or continue a supply to a consumer; or
(c)to recommence the supply to a consumer after it has been discontinued,
then, subject to paragraph (2), any difference which arises between the consumer and the supplier shall be determined by a person appointed by the Secretary of State on the application of the consumer or the supplier and such person may make a direction as to whether the costs of such determination (including any fees or expenses payable to him) shall be borne by the supplier or the consumer.
(2) A person appointed under paragraph (1) shall not determine that the supplier was or is entitled under regulations 27 and 28 to refuse a supply to that installation if the appointed person is satisfied that—
(a)the installation has continued to function satisfactorily and without risk of danger up to the material time; and
(b)the installation is to be, or is being, continued in use only within the limits of the maximum power for which it was intended; and
(c)there are no grounds for supposing that the installation will fail to function satisfactorily for a further reasonable period without risk of danger or of undue interference with the supplier’s system or with the supply to others.
(3) A copy of this regulation and regulation 28 shall be endorsed upon or accompany every notice given by the supplier to a consumer pursuant to this Part of these Regulations.
(4) In any case where in pursuance of these Regulations, an Electricity Board refuses to commence a supply to a consumer or to connect permanently a consumer’s installation with its electric lines, it shall as soon as practicable give notice in writing of its refusal specifying the matter complained of, and any difference which may arise between the consumer and the Electricity Board in regard to the matters specified in the notice, or as to any period specified for remedying the same in any such notice, shall be determined in the manner provided in this regulation.
Declaration of phases, frequency and voltage at supply terminals30.—(1) Before commencing to give a supply to a consumer, the supplier shall declare to the consumer—
(a)the number and rotation of phases;
(b)the frequency; and
(c)the voltage,
at which it proposes to deliver the supply and the extent of the permitted variations of those values:
Provided that, unless otherwise agreed between the supplier and the consumer, the frequency to be declared shall be 50 hertz and the voltage to be declared in respect of a low voltage supply shall be 240 volts between the phase and neutral conductors at the supply terminals.
(2) For the purposes of this regulation, and unless otherwise agreed by the consumer, the permitted variations are—
(a)a variation not exceeding one per cent above or below the declared frequency; and
(b)a variation not exceeding six per cent above or below the declared voltage at that frequency where that voltage is below 132 kV, and not exceeding 10 per cent above or below the declared voltage where that voltage is 132 kV or above,
or the variation which may have been authorised by the Secretary of State under paragraph (3).
(3) The Secretary of State may, on application by a supplier, authorise him to alter any of the declared values or any permitted variation if he gives such notice of his application as the Secretary of State may require.
(4) The supplier shall forthwith give notice of any authorisation under paragraph (3) to every consumer to whose supply it may apply.
(5) The supplier shall ensure that, save in exceptional circumstances, any supply he gives complies with the declaration under paragraph (1).
(6) The polarity of direct current and the number and rotation of phases in any supply shall not be varied without the agreement of the consumer or, in the absence of such agreement, the consent of the Secretary of State who may impose such conditions, if any, as he thinks appropriate.
Information to be provided on request31.  The supplier shall provide in respect of the existing or proposed installation of a consumer at low voltage a written statement of—
(a)the maximum prospective short circuit current at the supply terminals; and
(b)the maximum earth loop impedance of the earth fault path outside the consumer’s installation; and
(c)the type and rating of the supplier’s fusible cut-out or switching device nearest to the supply terminals,
which apply, or will apply, to that installation to any person who can show reasonable cause for requiring that information.
Electricity Boards to provide constant supply32.  From the time when any Electricity Board begins to supply it shall, unless otherwise agreed with the consumer, maintain the supply:
Provided that—
(a)for the purposes of testing or for any other purpose connected with the discharge of the Board’s functions; or
(b)in case of an inevitable accident or force majeure affecting or liable to affect the proper maintenance of the supply,
the supply may be discontinued by the Board for such period as may be necessary but no longer, subject (except in a case of an inevitable accident or force majeure) to not less than two days notice being given by the Board to all consumers likely to be affected by the discontinuance.
PART VIIMISCELLANEOUSInspections, etc. for the Secretary of State33.—(1) For the purpose of ascertaining whether a breach of these Regulations may have occurred, a person duly authorised by the Secretary of State shall be entitled at all times to inspect and to make examinations and tests of a supplier’s works and to examine and take records of the readings of any instruments used by the supplier.
(2) The supplier shall afford reasonable facilities for any such inspection, examination or test, but shall not be responsible for any interruption in the supply which may be occasioned thereby.
Notification of specified events34.—(1) Every supplier shall give to the Secretary of State notice in accordance with paragraph (3) in respect of any event specified in paragraph (2), whether or not that event was caused accidentally.
(2) The events referred to in paragraph (1) are—
(a)any event attributable in whole or in part to the generation, transformation, control, distribution or supply of energy up to and including the supply terminals which has given rise to—
(i)the death of any person other than a person engaged by the supplier for the purposes of his business;
(ii)an injury (including any electric shock)
to any person other than a person engaged by the supplier for the purposes of his business;
(iii)any fire; or
(iv)any explosion or implosion;
(b)any event attributable in whole or in part to the presence of energy on the consumer’s side of the supply terminals on any non-industrial and non-commercial premises resulting in the death of any person;
(c)any event, whether or not accompanied by an event specified in sub-paragraph (a) above, which caused an overhead line to be at a height less than that required by regulation 13(2);
(d)the occurrence of any damage to any underground electric line of the supplier resulting from an event not specified in sub-paragraphs (a) and (b) above; and
(e)any event other than those listed in sub-paragraphs (a), (c) or (d) above which, taking into account the circumstances of that event, was likely to cause any of the events listed in sub-paragraph (a).
(3) The notice shall be in writing and—
(a)in respect of the events specified in paragraphs (2)(a) and (b)—
(i)shall be sent to the Secretary of State by the quickest practicable means after the event becomes known to the supplier; and
(ii)shall contain the particulars specified in Parts I and II respectively of Schedule 4;
(b)in respect of the events notifiable under paragraphs (2)(c) and (e)—
(i)shall be sent to the Secretary of State by means of a return to be submitted within 15 days of the end of the month in which the event became known to the supplier; and
(ii)in respect of an event specified in paragraph (2)(c)
shall contain the particulars specified in Part III of Schedule 4; and
(iii)in respect of an event specified in paragraph (2)(e)
shall contain the particulars specified in whichever of Parts I, II and III Of Schedule 4 is most appropriate to the circumstances;
(c)in respect of the events notifiable under paragraph (2)(d)—
(i)shall be sent to the Secretary of State by means of a return to be submitted within one month of the period of 3 months ending on 31st March, 30th June, 30th September or 31st December as the case may be, in which the event became known to the supplier; and
(ii)shall contain the particulars specified in Part IV of Schedule 4; and
(d)shall, in every case, indicate by a unique and sequential reference number, in respect of each year ending on 31st March, the number of that report.
(4) Notices in respect of any event specified in paragraph (2)(a), (b), (c) or (e) shall be sent to the Secretary of State notwithstanding that the supplier is unable to give the full particulars required by Parts I, II or III of Schedule 4 and any particulars omitted shall be sent by the supplier in a supplementary notice to the Secretary of State by the earliest practicable means after they become known to the supplier.
(5) Without prejudice to paragraph (3), the supplier shall give notice to the Secretary of State by telephone, telex or other immediate means of communication of any death reportable under paragraph (2)(a)(i) immediately the event becomes known to the supplier.
Notification of supply failure35.—(1) Every supplier shall send to the Secretary of State notice in accordance with paragraph (2) of failures of supply of which two days prior notice has not been given where there has been—
(a)any single interruption of supply to one or more consumers of 20 megawatts or more for a period of one minute or longer; or
(b)any single interruption of supply to one or more consumers of 5 megawatts or more for a period of one hour or longer; or
(c)any single interruption of supply to 5,000 or more consumers for a period of one hour or longer.
(2) The notice shall—
(a)be sent by the earliest practicable means after the failure becomes known to the supplier;
(b)contain the particulars specified in Schedule 5.
(3) The notice shall be Sent to the Secretary of State notwithstanding that the supplier is unable to give the full particulars required by Schedule 5 and any particulars omitted shall be sent by the supplier in a supplementary notice to the Secretary of State by the earliest practicable means after they became known to the supplier.
Maps of supplier’s works underground36.—(1) This regulation applies in respect of supplier’s works placed below ground other than works placed in land under the control of the supplier.
(2) Subject to paragraph (6), every supplier shall cause to be made and, so far as is reasonably practicable, kept up to date, a map or series of maps indicating the position and depth below surface level of all his works.
(3) The supplier shall make a copy of the whole or the relevant part of any map prepared for the purpose of paragraph (2) available for inspection by any of—
(a)the Secretary of State;
(b)the local planning authority for the area where the supplier’s works in the map are situated; and
(c)any other person who can show reasonable cause for requiring to inspect any part of the map,
and shall, on request, provide a copy of such map or part of the map free of charge.
(4) Where the supplier is not an Electricity Board and has prepared a map for the purposes of paragraph (2) he shall provide, free of charge, to every Electricity Board a copy of that part of the map which relates to the area of that Electricity Board.
(5) Any map prepared for the purposes of paragraph (2) may be prepared and retained by electronic means provided that that means has the capability of reproducing such map in printed form.
(6) Nothing in this regulation shall require the inclusion on a map prepared for the purposes of paragraph (2) of information relating to the position and depth below surface level of supplier’s works which were placed below ground before the coming into force of this regulation where it would not be reasonably practicable to obtain such information.
Exemption from requirements of Regulations37.—(1) Where a request is made to the Secretary of State to grant an exemption from a requirement of these Regulations, that request shall be made in writing and shall state the full extent of the reasons for the exemption sought.
(2) Where the Secretary of State is satisfied that an exemption may be granted without prejudice to safety or interference with the supply to others, the Secretary of State may grant such an exemption as he thinks appropriate.
Works in breach of Regulations38.—(1) Paragraphs (2) to (10) shall apply in any case where the Secretary of State is satisfied that—
(a)any supplier’s works or any part thereof which are constructed, placed, erected, maintained, or used otherwise than in accordance with these Regulations; or
(b)any part of a consumer’s installation which is not enclosed in a building; or
(c)those works, that installation or the part thereof which are or is in breach of any relevant exemption or other relevant provision made under these Regulations in force at the time when the notice referred to in paragraph (2) is given,
are or is liable to
(i)become a source of danger to others; or
(ii)interfere with a supply to others.
(2) The Secretary of State may serve notice in writing on the supplier or consumer specifying the matter of which he is satisfied and require that those works, that installation or the part specified in the notice—
(a)shall not be used, or shall be used only subject to compliance with such conditions as that notice may specify; or
(b)shall be made dead; or
(c)shall be removed,
within the time specified in that notice and the person on whom that notice is served shall comply with the provisions of that notice.
(3) Where such a notice has required that any works, installation or part shall not be used or shall be made dead that notice shall remain in effect until such time as the works, installation or part specified in the notice shall comply with these Regulations or until the Secretary of State shall withdraw the notice.
(4) If, within the period specified by that notice for compliance or such longer period as the Secretary of State may allow, the person on whom the notice is served disputes the basis for, or the requirements of, any such notice, he may give notice in writing to the Secretary of State of that dispute and shall state the grounds.
(5) Where a notice is given to the Secretary of State pursuant to paragraph (4), the Secretary of State shall refer the dispute to an independent person agreed between the Secretary of State and the person giving the notice, or in default of agreement, to a person nominated by the President for the time being of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.
(6) The person to whom a dispute is referred shall, on reaching a determination of the dispute, make a direction as to whether the person giving the notice under paragraph (4) shall bear the costs of the reference (including any fees or expenses payable to him) or whether those costs shall be borne by the Secretary of State.
(7) The person to whom a dispute is referred may decide
(a)to uphold the notice; or
(b)to recommend to the Secretary of State that the notice be withdrawn or modified, and
shall notify his decision in writing to the Secretary of State and to the person giving notice under paragraph (4).
(8) The person to whom a dispute is referred may and, if so requested by any party to the dispute, shall—
(a)give the parties to the dispute an opportunity of appearing before and being heard by him; and
(b)make an inspection of the supplier’s works, or consumer’s installation the subject of the dispute.
(9) Where it appears to the person to whom a dispute is referred that any person, not being a party to the dispute, has an interest in the outcome of that dispute, he may at his discretion treat that person as if he were a party to the dispute.
(10) A copy of this regulation shall be endorsed upon or accompany every notice served by the Secretary of State pursuant to this regulation.
Offences39.  Any supplier who fails to comply with any provision of these Regulations, any person who fails to comply with regulation 26 and any consumer who fails to comply with regulation 38 shall be guilty of an offence under section 16 of the Energy Act 1983.
Cecil ParkinsonSecretary of State for EnergyDated 16th June 1988Malcolm RifkindSecretary of State for ScotlandDated 16th June 1988

Electricity and quality regs 2002

Written by Admin. Posted in Electrical regulations

STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS2002 No. 2665ELECTRICITYThe Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002

Made - - - - - 24th October 2002Laid before Parliament 28th October 2002Coming into force - - 31st January 2003

ARRANGEMENT OF REGULATIONS
PART I
INTRODUCTORY
1. Citation, commencement and interpretation
2. Application of Regulations
3. General adequacy of electrical equipment
4. Duty of co-operation
5. Inspection of networks
PART II
PROTECTION AND EARTHING
6. Electrical protection
7. Continuity of the supply neutral conductor and earthing connections
8. General requirements for connection with earth
9. Protective multiple earthing
10. Earthing of metalwork
11. Substation safety
PART III
SUBSTATIONS
PART IV
UNDERGROUND CABLES AND EQUIPMENT
12. General restriction on the use of underground cables
13. Protective screens
14. Excavations and depth of underground cables
15. Maps of underground networks
1
PART V
OVERHEAD LINES
16. General restriction on the use of overhead lines
17. Minimum height of overhead lines, wires and cables
18. Position, insulation and protection of overhead lines
19. Precautions against access and warnings of dangers
20. Fitting of insulators to stay wires
PART VI
GENERATION
21. Switched alternative sources of energy
22. Parallel operation
PART VII
SUPPLIES TO INSTALLATIONS AND TO OTHER NETWORKS
23. Precautions against supply failure
24. Equipment on a consumer’s premises
25. Connections to installations or to other networks
26. Disconnection of supply, refusal to connect and resolution of disagreements
27. Declaration of phases, frequency and voltage at supply terminals
28. Information to be provided on request
29. Discontinuation of supplies
PART VIII
MISCELLANEOUS
30. Inspections, etc. for the Secretary of State
31. Notification of specified events
32. Notification of certain interruptions of supply
33. Exemption from requirements of Regulations
34. Networks, equipment or installations in breach of Regulations
35. OVences
36. Revocation
SCHEDULES
1. Design, colours and proportions of the safety sign
2. Minimum height above ground of overhead lines
3. Notification of specified events
4. Notification of certain interruptions of supply
5. Revocations
2
The Secretary of State, in exercise of the powers conferred on her by sections 29, 30(3) and 60
of the Electricity Act 1989(a), hereby makes the following Regulations:—
PART I
INTRODUCTORY
Citation, commencement and interpretation
1.—(1) These Regulations may be cited as the Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity
Regulations 2002 and shall come into force on 31st January 2003.
(2) Any requirement in these Regulations for goods or materials to comply with a specified
standard shall be satisfied by compliance with an equivalent standard or code of practice of a
national standards or equivalent body of any EEA State, in so far as the standard or code of
practice in question enables electricity safety, quality or continuity considerations to be met in
an equivalent manner.
(3) In paragraph (2) the expression “EEA State” means a State which is a Contracting Party
to the Agreement on the European Economic Area signed at Oporto on 2nd May 1992 as
adjusted by the Protocol signed at Brussels on 17th March 1993.
(4) Unless the context otherwise requires, any reference in these Regulations to the provision
of information “in writing” shall include the provision of such information by electronic mail,
facsimile or similar means which are capable of producing a document containing the text of
any communication.
(5) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—
“British Standard Requirements” means the British Standard Requirements for Electrical
Installations BS 7671 : 2001 IEE Wiring Regulations 16th Edition ISBN 0 85296 988 0,
2001 (as amended by Amendment No. 1 (AMD 13628) February 2002);
“conductor” means an electrical conductor arranged to be electrically connected to a
network but does not include conductors used or intended to be used solely for the
purposes of control, protection or regulation of supply or for communication;
“connected with earth” means connected with earth in such manner as will at all times
provide a rapid and safe discharge of energy, and cognate expressions shall be construed
accordingly;
“consumer” means any person supplied or entitled to be supplied by a supplier but in
regulations 24, 25 and 26 shall not include, in respect of any supply to meet haulage or
traction requirements, any person who is an operator of a network within the meaning of
Part I of the Railways Act 1993(b);
“consumer’s installation” means the electric lines situated upon the consumer’s side of the
supply terminals together with any equipment permanently connected or intended to be
permanently connected thereto on that side;
“danger” includes danger to health or danger to life or limb from electric shock, burn,
injury or mechanical movement to persons, livestock or domestic animals, or from fire or
explosion, attendant upon the generation, transmission, transformation, distribution or
use of energy;
“distributing main” means a low voltage electric line which connects a distributor’s source
of voltage to one or more service lines or directly to a single consumer’s installation;
“distributor” means a person who owns or operates a network, except for a network where
that person is an operator of a network within the meaning of Part I of the Railways
Act 1993;
“earth” means the general mass of the earth;
“earth electrode” means a conductor or group of conductors in intimate contact with, and
providing a connection with, earth;
a)( 1989 c. 29; sections 29 and 30 were amended by the Utilities Act 2000 (c. 27), Schedule 6, paragraphs 24, 30 and 31.
Section 60 was amended by section 3(2) of the Utilities Act 2000.
b)( 1993 c. 43; see sections 6(2) and 83.



3
“electric line” means any line which is used or intended to be used for carrying electricity
for any purpose and includes, unless the context otherwise requires—
(a) any equipment connected to any such line for the purpose of carrying
electricity; and
(b) any wire, cable, tube, pipe, insulator or other similar thing (including its casing
or coating) which surrounds or supports, or is associated with, any such line;
“energy” means electrical energy;
“equipment” includes plant, meters, lines, supports, appliances and associated items used
or intended to be used for carrying electricity for the purposes of generating, transmitting
or distributing energy, or for using or measuring energy;
“generating station” means those parts of any premises which are principally used for the
purpose of generating energy;
“generator” means a person who generates electricity at high voltage for the purpose of
supplying consumer’s installations via a network;
“high voltage” means any voltage exceeding low voltage;
“insulation” means non-conducting material enclosing or surrounding a conductor or any
part thereof and of such quality and thickness as to withstand the operating voltage of the
equipment;
“insulator” means a device which supports a live conductor or which electrically separates
the upper and lower parts of a stay wire;
“low voltage” means—
(a) in relation to alternating current, a voltage exceeding 50 volts measured between
phase conductors (or between phase conductors and earth), but not exceeding 1000
volts measured between phase conductors (or 600 volts if measured between phase
conductors and earth), calculated by taking the square root of the mean of the squares
of the instantaneous values of a voltage during a complete cycle; and
(b) in relation to direct current, a voltage exceeding 120 volts measured between live
conductors (or between live conductors and earth), but not exceeding 1500 volts
measured between live conductors (or 900 volts if measured between live conductors
and earth),
with any variations of voltage allowed by these Regulations;
“metalwork” does not include any electric line or conductor used for earthing purposes;
“meter operator” means a person who installs, maintains or removes metering equipment
used for measuring the flow of energy to or from a network at or near the supply terminals;
“network” means an electrical system supplied by one or more sources of voltage and
comprising all the conductors and other equipment used to conduct electricity for the
purposes of conveying energy from the source or sources of voltage to one or more
consumer’s installations, street electrical fixtures, or other networks, but does not include
an electrical system which is situated entirely on an oVshore installation;
“neutral conductor” means a conductor which is, or is intended to be, connected to the
neutral point of an electrical system and intended to contribute to the carrying of energy;
“overhead line” means any electric line which is placed above ground and in the open air;
“phase conductor” means a conductor for the carrying of energy other than a neutral
conductor or a protective conductor or a conductor used for earthing purposes;
“protective conductor” means a conductor which is used for protection against electric
shock and which connects the exposed conductive parts of equipment with earth;
“service line” means an electric line which connects either a street electrical fixture, or no
more than four consumer’s installations in adjacent buildings, to a distributing main;
“street electrical fixture” means a permanent fixture which is or is intended to be connected
to a supply of electricity and which is in, on, or is associated with a highway;
“substation” means any premises or part thereof which contain equipment for either
transforming or converting energy to or from high voltage (other than transforming or
converting solely for the operation of switching devices or instruments) or for switching,
controlling or regulating energy at high voltage, but does not include equipment mounted
on a support to any overhead line;
“supplier” means a person who contracts to supply electricity to consumers;
“supply” means the supply of electricity;



4
“supply neutral conductor” means the neutral conductor of a low voltage network which
is or is intended to be connected with earth, but does not include any part of the neutral
conductor on the consumer’s side of the supply terminals;
“supply terminals” means the ends of the electric lines at which the supply is delivered to
a consumer’s installation;
“support” means any structure, pole or other device, in, on, by or from which any electric
line is or may be supported, carried or suspended and includes stays and struts, but does
not include insulators, their fittings or any building or structure the principal purpose of
which is not the support of electric lines or equipment;
“switching device” includes any device which can either make or break a current, or
both; and
“underground cable” means any conductor surrounded by insulation which is placed
below ground.
(6) In relation to a distributor, generator or meter operator a reference in these Regulations
to his network, his overhead line, his substation or his equipment is a reference to a network,
an overhead line, a substation or equipment (as the case may be) owned or operated by him.
(7) Words and expressions to which meanings are assigned by these Regulations shall (unless
the contrary intention appears) have the same meanings in any document issued by the
Secretary of State under these Regulations.
Application of Regulations
2.—(1) Except as provided for in paragraph (2), in so far as these Regulations apply to any
generator, distributor, supplier or meter operator, they shall also apply to any agent, contractor
or sub-contractor of his acting on his behalf in relation to a matter which is the subject of these
Regulations.
(2) Regulations 4, 15, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31 and 32 shall not apply to any agent, contractor or
sub-contractor.
(3) Regulation 3(2) shall not apply until, in the case of overhead lines, 5 years, and, in the
case of substations, 2 years after the coming into force of these Regulations.
(4) Regulation 7(2) shall not apply to any distributor’s fusible cut-out brought into use on
or before 31st December 1936, until 10 years after the coming into force of these Regulations.
(5) Regulation 11(c) shall not apply until 2 years after the coming into force of these
Regulations.
(6) Paragraphs (2) and (3) of regulation 14 shall not apply to any low voltage underground
cable installed on or before the day before the day on which these Regulations come into force.
(7) Regulations 19(2) and 20 shall not apply until 10 years after the coming into force of these
Regulations.
(8) Where a material alteration is made to any part of a network, the provisions in
paragraphs (4) to (7) shall cease to apply to that part of the network from the date of that
alteration.
(9) Where any provision of these Regulations does not apply to any network, or part of a
network, by virtue of any of the provisions of paragraphs (4) to (7), any equivalent provision
which applied to the network, or part of it, as the case may be, immediately before the coming
into force of these Regulations by virtue of the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988(a) including
any approval, authority or exemption granted or given under or pursuant to that provision
shall apply as if that equivalent provision had been contained in these Regulations.
(10) Where any provision of these Regulations is equivalent to a provision which applied to
any network, or part of a network, immediately before the coming into force of these
Regulations by virtue of the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988, any approval, authority or
exemption granted or given under or pursuant to the latter provision which was in force
immediately before the coming into force of these Regulations shall continue in force and shall
have eVect as if granted or given under or pursuant to the former provision but shall cease to
have eVect one year after the coming into force of these Regulations.
a)( S.I. 1988/1057, amended by S.I. 1990/390, 1992/2961, 1994/533, 1994/3021, 1998/2971.



5
General adequacy of electrical equipment
3.—(1) Generators, distributors and meter operators shall ensure that their equipment is—
(a) suYcient for the purposes for and the circumstances in which it is used; and
(b) so constructed, installed, protected (both electrically and mechanically), used and
maintained as to prevent danger, interference with or interruption of supply, so far as
is reasonably practicable.
(2) Generators and distributors shall—
(a) for each of their overhead lines or part thereof and for each of their substations, assess
the foreseeable risk of danger from interference, vandalism or unauthorised access,
having regard to both the nature of the equipment and use of the surrounding land,
and classify the degree of the risk;
(b) enter details of the result of the classification of risk in a register or other permanent
record kept updated for the purpose; and
(c) take measures to safeguard the equipment commensurate with the nature and class of
risk to which it gives rise.
(3) Generators and distributors shall take reasonable steps to ensure that the public are
made aware of dangers which may arise from activities carried out in proximity to overhead
lines, and to indicate the means by which those dangers may be avoided.
(4) Generators and distributors shall take precautions to prevent, so far as is reasonably
practicable, danger due to the influx of water, or any noxious or explosive liquid or gas, into
any enclosed space, arising from the installation or operation of their equipment.
Duty of co-operation
4. Generators, distributors, suppliers and meter operators shall—
(a) disclose such information to each other as might reasonably be required in order to
ensure compliance with these Regulations; and
(b) otherwise co-operate amongst themselves so far as is necessary in order to ensure
compliance with these Regulations.
Inspection of networks
5. A generator or distributor shall, so far as is reasonably practicable, inspect his network
with suYcient frequency so that he is aware of what action he needs to take so as to ensure
compliance with these Regulations and, in the case of his substations and overhead lines, shall
maintain for a period of not less than 10 years a record of such an inspection including any
recommendations arising therefrom.
PART II
PROTECTION AND EARTHING
Electrical protection



6. A generator or distributor shall be responsible for the application of such protective
devices to his network as will, so far as is reasonably practicable, prevent any current, including
any leakage to earth, from flowing in any part of his network for such a period that that part
of his network can no longer carry that current without danger.
Continuity of the supply neutral conductor and earthing connections
7.—(1) A generator or distributor shall, in the design, construction, maintenance or
operation of his network, take all reasonable precautions to ensure continuity of the supply
neutral conductor.
(2) No generator or distributor shall introduce or retain any protective device in any supply
neutral conductor or any earthing connection of a low voltage network which he owns or
operates.
6
General requirements for connection with earth
8.—(1) A generator or distributor shall ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, his
network does not become disconnected from earth in the event of any foreseeable current due
to a fault.
(2) A generator or distributor shall, in respect of any high voltage network which he owns
or operates, ensure that—
(a) the network is connected with earth at, or as near as is reasonably practicable to, the
source of voltage but where there is more than one source of voltage in that network,
the connection with earth need only be made at one such point;
(b) the earth electrodes are designed, installed and used in such a manner so as to prevent
danger occurring in any low voltage network as a result of any fault in the high voltage
network; and
(c) where the network is connected with earth through a continuously rated arc
suppression coil, an automatic warning is given to the generator or distributor (as the
case may be) of any fault which causes the arc suppression coil to operate.
(3) A generator or distributor shall, in respect of any low voltage network which he owns or
operates, ensure that—
(a) the outer conductor of any electric line which has concentric conductors is connected
with earth;
(b) every supply neutral conductor is connected with earth at, or as near as is reasonably
practicable to, the source of voltage except that where there is only one point in a
network at which consumer’s installations are connected to a single source of voltage,
that connection may be made at that point, or at another point nearer to the source
of voltage; and
(c) no impedance is inserted in any connection with earth of a low voltage network other
than that required for the operation of switching devices or of instruments or
equipment for control, telemetry or metering.
(4) A consumer shall not combine the neutral and protective functions in a single conductor
in his consumer’s installation.
(5) Paragraphs (1) to (3) shall not apply to a network which is situated within a generating
station if, and only if, adequate alternative arrangements are in place to prevent danger.
Protective multiple earthing
9.—(1) This regulation applies to distributors’ low voltage networks in which the neutral
and protective functions are combined.
(2) In addition to the neutral with earth connection required under regulation 8(3)(b) a
distributor shall ensure that the supply neutral conductor is connected with earth at—
(a) a point no closer to the distributor’s source of voltage (as measured along the
distributing main) than the junction between that distributing main and the service
line which is most remote from the source; and
(b) such other points as may be necessary to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable,
the risk of danger arising from the supply neutral conductor becoming open circuit.
(3) Paragraph (2)(a) shall only apply where the supply neutral conductor of the service line
referred to in paragraph (2)(a) is connected to the protective conductor of a consumer’s
installation.
(4) The distributor shall not connect his combined neutral and protective conductor to any
metalwork in a caravan or boat.
Earthing of metalwork
10.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), and without prejudice to any other requirement as to
earthing, a generator, distributor or meter operator, as the case may be, shall ensure that any
metalwork enclosing, supporting or otherwise associated with his equipment in a network and
which is not intended to serve as a phase conductor is, where necessary to prevent danger,
connected with earth.



7
(2) Paragraph (1) shall not apply—
(a) to any metalwork attached to, or forming part of, a wooden pole support, the design
and construction of which is such as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable,
danger within 3 metres of the ground from any failure of insulation or failure of
insulators; or
(b) to any wall-mounted metal bracket carrying an overhead line not connected with
earth, where the line is both supported by an insulator and the part of the line in
contact with the insulator is itself surrounded by insulation.
PART III
SUBSTATIONS
Substation safety
11. Every generator and distributor shall, for every substation which he owns or operates—
(a) enclose the substation where necessary to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable,
danger or unauthorised access;
(b) enclose any part of the substation, which is open to the air and contains live
equipment which is not encased, with a fence or wall not less than 2.4 metres in height
to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, danger or unauthorised access;
(c) ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, there are at all times displayed—
(i) suYcient safety signs which comply with Schedule 1 and which are of such size
and placed in such positions as are necessary to give due warning of such danger
as is reasonably foreseeable in the circumstances;
(ii) a notice which is placed in a conspicuous position and which gives the location
or identification of the substation, the name of each generator or distributor who
owns or operates the substation equipment making up the substation and the
telephone number where a suitably qualified person appointed for this purpose
by the generator or distributor will be in constant attendance; and
(iii) such other signs, which are of such size and placed in such positions, as are
necessary to give due warning of danger having regard to the siting of, the nature
of, and the measures taken to ensure the physical security of, the substation
equipment;
and
(d) take all reasonable precautions to minimise the risk of fire associated with the
equipment.
PART IV
UNDERGROUND CABLES AND EQUIPMENT
General restriction on the use of underground cables
12. No generator or distributor shall use any of his underground cables and associated
equipment (except those in generating stations or substations) which he knows do not comply
with regulations 13 and 14.
Protective screens
13.—(1) Underground cables and associated equipment which contain conductors not
connected with earth shall be protected in accordance with paragraph (2).
(2) The protection referred to in paragraph (1) shall comprise—
(a) in respect of joints or terminations of a conductor in a low voltage system, some form
of mechanical protection; and



8
(b) in respect of any other part of any conductor, an electrically continuous metallic
screen connected with earth,
so placed as to ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, any tool or device likely to be
used in the vicinity will make contact with that protection or screen before it can make contact
with any conductors not connected with earth.
Excavations and depth of underground cables
14.—(1) Every underground cable shall be kept at such depth or be otherwise protected so
as to avoid, so far as is reasonably practicable, any damage or danger by reason of such uses
of the land which can be reasonably expected.
(2) In addition to satisfying the requirements of paragraph (1), an underground cable
containing conductors not connected with earth shall be protected, marked or otherwise
indicated so as to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that any person excavating the land
above the cable will be given suYcient warning of its presence.
(3) The protection, marking or indication required by paragraph (2) shall be made by
placing the cable in a pipe or duct or by overlaying the cable at a suitable distance with
protective tiles or warning tape or by the provision of such other protective or warning device,
mark or indication, or by a suitable combination of such measures, as will be likely to provide
an appropriate warning.
Maps of underground networks
15.—(1) This regulation applies in respect of any network or part thereof, owned or
operated by a generator or distributor which is below ground on land which is not under his
control.
(2) Every generator or distributor shall have and, so far as is reasonably practicable, keep
up to date, a map or series of maps indicating the position and depth below surface level of all
networks or parts thereof which he owns or operates.
(3) The generator or distributor shall make a copy of the whole or the relevant part of any
map prepared or kept for the purposes of paragraph (2) available for inspection by any of—
(a) the Secretary of State;
(b) the local planning authority, or, in Scotland, the planning authority, for the area
where the network or part thereof is situated; and
(c) any other person who can show reasonable cause for requiring to inspect any part of
the map,
and shall, on request, provide a copy of such map or part of the map.
(4) The generator or distributor may, at his discretion, require payment of a reasonable fee
for the inspection or copying of the map or part thereof referred to in paragraph (3).
(5) Any map prepared for the purposes of paragraph (2) may be prepared and kept by
electronic means provided that that means has the capability of reproducing such map in
printed form.
(6) Nothing in this regulation shall require the inclusion, on a map prepared or kept for the
purposes of paragraph (2), of information relating to the position and depth below surface level
of networks or parts thereof which were placed below ground before 1st October 1988 where
it would not be reasonably practicable to obtain such information.



9
PART V
OVERHEAD LINES
General restriction on the use of overhead lines
16.—(1) No generator or distributor shall use any of his overhead lines (except those in
generating stations and substations) which he knows do not comply with this Part of these
Regulations.
(2) No overhead line shall be used for the purpose of supply at a nominal voltage greater
than 400,000 volts.
Minimum height of overhead lines, wires and cables
17.—(1) Subject to paragraph (3), the height above ground of any overhead line, at the
maximum likely temperature of that line, shall not be less than that specified by paragraph (2).
(2) In relation to an overhead line used, or intended to be used, at a voltage specified in
column 1 of Schedule 2 the height referred to in paragraph (1) shall be—
(a) at any point where that line is over a road accessible to vehicular traYc, the height
specified in column 2 of Schedule 2 as appropriate to that voltage; and
(b) at any other point, the height specified in column 3 of Schedule 2 as appropriate to
that voltage.
(3) Paragraph (2) does not apply to any section of an overhead line at a point where it is not
over a road accessible to vehicular traYc and which—
(a) is surrounded by insulation; or
(b) is not surrounded by insulation but is at least 4.3 metres above ground and connects
equipment mounted on a support to any overhead line; or
(c) is connected with earth.
(4) The height above ground of any wire or cable which is attached to a support carrying any
overhead line shall not be less than 5.8 metres at any point where it is over a road accessible to
vehicular traYc.
Position, insulation and protection of overhead lines
18.—(1) Any part of an overhead line which is not connected with earth and which is not
ordinarily accessible shall be supported on insulators or surrounded by insulation.
(2) Any part of an overhead line which is not connected with earth and which is ordinarily
accessible shall be—
(a) made dead; or
(b) so insulated that it is protected, so far as is reasonably practicable, against mechanical
damage or interference; or
(c) adequately protected to prevent danger.
(3) Any person responsible for erecting a building or structure which will cause any part of
an overhead line which is not connected with earth to become ordinarily accessible shall give
reasonable notice to the generator or distributor who owns or operates the overhead line of his
intention to erect that building or structure.
(4) Any bare conductor not connected with earth, which is part of a low voltage overhead
line, shall be situated throughout its length directly above a bare conductor which is connected
with earth.
(5) No overhead line shall, so far as is reasonably practicable, come so close to any building,
tree or structure as to cause danger.
(6) In this regulation the expression “ordinarily accessible” means the overhead line could
be reached by hand if any scaVolding, ladder or other construction was erected or placed on,
in, against or near to a building or structure.



10
Precautions against access and warnings of dangers
19.—(1) Every support carrying a high voltage overhead line shall, if the circumstances
reasonably require, be fitted with devices to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any
unauthorised person from reaching a position at which any such line would be a source of
danger.
(2) Every support carrying a high voltage overhead line, and every support carrying a low
voltage overhead line incorporating bare phase conductors, shall have attached to it suYcient
safety signs complying with Schedule 1 of such size and placed in such positions as are necessary
to give due warning of such danger as is reasonably foreseeable in the circumstances.
Fitting of insulators to stay wires
20. Every stay wire which forms part of, or is attached to, any support carrying an overhead
line incorporating bare phase conductors (except where the support is a lattice steel structure
or other structure entirely of metal and connected to earth) shall be fitted with an insulator no
part of which shall be less than 3 metres above ground or above the normal height of any such
line attached to that support.
PART VI
GENERATION
Switched alternative sources of energy
21. Where a person operates a source of energy as a switched alternative to a distributor’s
network, he shall ensure that that source of energy cannot operate in parallel with that network
and where the source of energy is part of a low voltage consumer’s installation, that installation
shall comply with British Standard Requirements.
Parallel operation
22.—(1) Without prejudice to regulation 21, no person shall install or operate a source of
energy which may be connected in parallel with a distributor’s network unless he—
(a) has the necessary and appropriate equipment to prevent danger or interference with
that network or with the supply to consumers so far as is reasonably practicable;
(b) has the necessary and appropriate personnel and procedures to prevent danger so far
as is reasonably practicable;
(c) where the source of energy is part of a low voltage consumer’s installation, complies
with British Standard Requirements; and
(d) agrees specific requirements with the distributor who owns or operates the network.
(2) Sub-paragraphs (b) and (d) of paragraph (1) shall not apply to a person who installs or
operates a source of energy which may be connected in parallel with a distributor’s network
provided that sub-paragraphs (a) and (c) of paragraph (1) are complied with; and
(a) the source of energy does not produce an electrical output exceeding 16 amperes per
phase at low voltage;
(b) the source of energy is configured to disconnect itself electrically from the parallel
connection when the distributor’s equipment disconnects the supply of electricity to
the person’s installation; and
(c) the person installing the source of energy ensures that the distributor is advised of the
intention to use the source of energy in parallel with the network before, or at the time
of, commissioning the source.



11
PART VII
SUPPLIES TO INSTALLATIONS AND TO OTHER NETWORKS
Precautions against supply failure
23.—(1) A distributor shall ensure that his network shall be—
(a) so arranged; and
(b) so provided, where necessary, with fuses or automatic switching devices,
appropriately located and set,
as to restrict, so far as is reasonably practicable, the number of consumers aVected by any fault
in his network.
(2) Subject to regulation 29, a distributor shall at all times take all reasonably practicable
steps to avoid interruptions of supply resulting from his own acts.
Equipment on a consumer’s premises
24.—(1) A distributor or meter operator shall ensure that each item of his equipment which
is on a consumer’s premises but which is not under the control of the consumer (whether
forming part of the consumer’s installation or not) is—
(a) suitable for its purpose;
(b) installed and, so far as is reasonably practicable, maintained so as to prevent
danger; and
(c) protected by a suitable fusible cut-out or circuit breaker which is situated as close as
is reasonably practicable to the supply terminals.
(2) Every circuit breaker or cut-out fuse forming part of the fusible cut-out mentioned in
paragraph (1)(c) shall be enclosed in a locked or sealed container as appropriate.
(3) Where they form part of his equipment which is on a consumer’s premises but which is
not under the control of the consumer, a distributor or meter operator (as appropriate) shall
mark permanently, so as clearly to identify the polarity of each of them, the separate conductors
of low voltage electric lines which are connected to supply terminals and such markings shall
be made at a point which is as close as is practicable to the supply terminals in question.
(4) Unless he can reasonably conclude that it is inappropriate for reasons of safety, a
distributor shall, when providing a new connection at low voltage, make available his supply
neutral conductor or, if appropriate, the protective conductor of his network for connection to
the protective conductor of the consumer’s installation.
(5) In this regulation the expression “new connection” means the first electric line, or the
replacement of an existing electric line, to one or more consumer’s installations.
Connections to installations or to other networks
25.—(1) No person shall make or alter a connection from a distributor’s network to a
consumer’s installation, a street electrical fixture or to another distributor’s network without
that distributor’s consent, unless such consent has been unreasonably withheld.
(2) A distributor shall not give his consent to the making or altering of the connection
referred to in paragraph (1), where he has reasonable grounds for believing that—
(a) the consumer’s installation, street electrical fixture or other distributor’s network fails
to comply with British Standard Requirements or these Regulations; or
(b) the connection itself will not be so constructed, installed, protected and used or
arranged for use, so as to prevent as far as is reasonably practicable, danger or
interruption of supply.
(3) Any dispute between a person to whom paragraph (1) refers and the distributor, arising
from delay in giving or refusal to give the consent required by paragraph (1) by virtue of the
provisions of paragraph (2), which cannot be resolved between them may be referred by either
of them to the Secretary of State who shall appoint a suitably qualified person to determine the
dispute and to order as he thinks fit whether the costs (or any part of them) associated with the
determination should be borne by one or other of the parties.



12
(4) Following the determination by the person appointed by the Secretary of State, the
distributor shall grant or withhold the consent required in paragraph (1) as appropriate, subject
to any conditions which the person appointed by the Secretary of State may stipulate in his
determination.
Disconnection of supply, refusal to connect and resolution of disagreements
26.—(1) Where a connection to a distributor’s network has been made, or is proposed, and
the distributor is not satisfied that the consumer’s installation or other distributor’s network or
street electrical fixture which is or would be connected to his network is or would be so
constructed, installed, protected and used or arranged for use so as to prevent, so far as is
reasonably practicable, danger or interference with his or any other distributor’s network, or
with the supply to any consumer’s installation or street electrical fixture, he may issue a notice
in writing to the consumer or other distributor or owner of the street electrical fixture (as the
case may be) requiring remedial works to be carried out within such reasonable period as may
be specified in the notice.
(2) If the remedial works specified in the notice by the distributor are not carried out by the
end of the period specified in the notice the distributor may disconnect or refuse to connect (as
the case may be) the supply to the consumer’s installation or other distributor’s network or
street electrical fixture, and in such an event the distributor shall by further notice in writing
addressed to the consumer or other distributor or owner of the street electrical fixture (as the
case may be) set out the reasons for the disconnection or refusal to connect.
(3) A distributor may disconnect the supply to the consumer’s installation or other
distributor’s network or street electrical fixture without giving notice as required by paragraph
(1) if such disconnection can be justified on grounds of safety, but in such an event the
distributor shall by notice in writing addressed to the consumer or other distributor or owner
of the street electrical fixture (as the case may be) and served as soon as reasonably practicable
after the disconnection, give the reasons for such disconnection and if applicable details of any
remedial measures required to be taken by the consumer or other distributor or owner of the
street electrical fixture.
(4) The distributor shall connect or restore the supply when the stipulated remedial measures
have been taken by the consumer or other distributor or owner of the street electrical fixture
(as the case may be) to the reasonable satisfaction of the distributor, or if no remedial measures
are required, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the grounds for disconnection have
ceased to apply.
(5) Any dispute between the distributor and the consumer or other distributor or owner of
the street electrical fixture (as the case may be), over the disconnection of or refusal to connect
the consumer’s installation or other distributor’s network or street electrical fixture which
cannot be resolved between them, may be referred by any of them to the Secretary of State who
shall appoint a suitably qualified person to determine the dispute and to order as he thinks fit
whether the costs (or any part of them) associated with the determination should be borne by
one or other of the parties.
(6) Where a referral is made to the Secretary of State in accordance with paragraph (5)
before the expiry of the notice period referred to in paragraph (1), the distributor shall not take
any action pursuant to paragraph (2) until the determination of the dispute.
(7) Following the determination by the person appointed by the Secretary of State, the
distributor shall maintain, connect, restore or may disconnect the supply as appropriate,
subject to any conditions which the person appointed by the Secretary of State may stipulate
in his determination.
(8) A copy of this regulation shall be endorsed upon or accompany every notice given by the
distributor pursuant to this regulation.
Declaration of phases, frequency and voltage at supply terminals
27.—(1) Before commencing a supply to a consumer’s installation, or when the existing
supply characteristics have been modified, the supplier shall ascertain from the distributor and
then declare to the consumer—
(a) the number of phases;
(b) the frequency; and



13
(c) the voltage,
at which it is proposed to supply electricity and the extent of the permitted variations thereto.
(2) Unless otherwise agreed in writing between the distributor, the supplier and the
consumer (and if necessary between the distributor and any other distributor likely to be
aVected) the frequency declared pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be 50 hertz and the voltage
declared in respect of a low voltage supply shall be 230 volts between the phase and neutral
conductors at the supply terminals.
(3) For the purposes of this regulation, unless otherwise agreed in writing by those persons
specified in paragraph (2), the permitted variations are—
(a) a variation not exceeding 1 per cent above or below the declared frequency;
(b) in the case of a low voltage supply, a variation not exceeding 10 per cent above or 6
per cent below the declared voltage at the declared frequency;
(c) in the case of a high voltage supply operating at a voltage below 132,000 volts, a
variation not exceeding 6 per cent above or below the declared voltage at the declared
frequency; and
(d) in the case of a high voltage supply operating at a voltage of 132,000 volts or above,
a variation not exceeding 10 per cent above or below the declared voltage at the
declared frequency.
(4) The Secretary of State may, following an application by any distributor aVected by a
declaration made pursuant to paragraph (1), authorise the variation of any of the values or
permitted variations contained in a declaration provided that the applicant has previously
given notice of his application to such persons and in such terms as the Secretary of State
may require.
(5) Where the Secretary of State has authorised a variation under paragraph (4) the
distributor shall forthwith serve notice of any such variation on every supplier, other
distributor referred to in paragraph (2), and consumer to whom it may apply.
(6) Every distributor shall ensure that, save in exceptional circumstances, the characteristics
of the supplies to consumer’s installations connected to his network comply with the
declarations made under paragraph (1).
(7) The number and rotation of phases in any supply shall not be varied by the distributor
except with the agreement of the consumer or, in the absence of such agreement, the consent
of the Secretary of State who may impose such conditions, if any, as she thinks appropriate.
Information to be provided on request
28. A distributor shall provide, in respect of any existing or proposed consumer’s
installation which is connected or is to be connected to his network, to any person who can
show a reasonable cause for requiring the information, a written statement of—
(a) the maximum prospective short circuit current at the supply terminals;
(b) for low voltage connections, the maximum earth loop impedance of the earth fault
path outside the installation;
(c) the type and rating of the distributor’s protective device or devices nearest to the
supply terminals;
(d) the type of earthing system applicable to the connection; and
(e) the information specified in regulation 27(1),
which apply, or will apply, to that installation.
Discontinuation of supplies
29.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), a distributor may discontinue a supply for the purposes
of testing or for any other purpose connected with the carrying on of his activities.
(2) A distributor may discontinue a supply pursuant to paragraph (1) only—
(a) for such period as may be necessary but no longer; and
(b) subject to paragraph (3), if not less than 2 days notice in writing has been received by
the relevant persons.



14
(3) A distributor may discontinue a supply even if the notice required by paragraph (2)(b)
has not been received by the relevant persons if—
(a) the discontinuation is agreed between the relevant persons and the distributor; or
(b) the distributor considers it necessary to discontinue supplies to the relevant persons
in order to prevent danger or to undertake essential emergency repairs; or
(c) if there is an urgent need to discontinue the supply relating to the safe or proper
operation of the network; or
(d) the notice is not received by the relevant persons due to circumstances not within the
control of the distributor.
(4) In this regulation the expression “relevant persons” means every consumer likely to be
aVected by a discontinuation of supply by a distributor and every other distributor likely to be
aVected by that discontinuation.
PART VIII
MISCELLANEOUS
Inspections, etc. for the Secretary of State
30.—(1) A generator or distributor whose equipment is subject to inspection, test or
examination for the purpose of ascertaining whether a breach of these Regulations may have
occurred, by an inspector appointed under section 30 of the Electricity Act 1989, shall aVord
reasonable facilities therefor.
(2) A generator or distributor shall provide such information to the inspector as he may
require for the purposes of performing his functions under this regulation.
Notification of specified events
31.—(1) Notice shall be given to the Secretary of State in accordance with this regulation by
the distributor in respect of any event which is of a type specified in paragraph (2)(b) where the
event involves a consumer’s installation which is connected to the distributor’s network and by
the generator, distributor or meter operator, as the case may be, in respect of any event which
is an event of a type otherwise specified in paragraph (2) and involves a network or equipment
which is in the ownership of, under the control of, or used by, the generator, distributor or
meter operator, as the case may be.
(2) The events referred to in paragraph (1) are—
(a) any event attributable in whole or in part to the generating, transforming, control or
carrying of energy up to and including the supply terminals, which has given rise to—
(i) the death of any person other than a person engaged by the generator, distributor
or meter operator for the purposes of his business; or
(ii) an injury (including any electric shock) to any person other than a person
engaged by the generator, distributor or meter operator for the purposes of his
business; or
(iii) any fire; or
(iv) any explosion or implosion;
(b) any event attributable in whole or in part to the presence of energy on the consumer’s
side of the supply terminals on any non-industrial and non-commercial premises
resulting in the death of any person;
(c) any event, whether or not accompanied by an event specified in sub-paragraph (a),
which caused an overhead line to be at a height less than that required by
regulation 17(2);
(d) the occurrence of any damage to any underground cable resulting from an event not
specified in sub-paragraphs (a) and (b); and
(e) any event other than those listed in sub-paragraph (a), (c) or (d) which, taking into
account the circumstances of that event, was likely to cause any of the events listed in
sub-paragraph (a).



15
(3) In respect of any event specified in paragraph (2)(a)—
(a) the requirement to give notice in accordance with paragraph (4) (so far as applicable)
applies in addition to the requirement to give notice in accordance with paragraph (5)
unless the notice given satisfies the requirements of both paragraphs; and
(b) the requirement to give notice in accordance with paragraphs (4) and (5) applies in
addition to the requirement to give notice in accordance with paragraph (6).
(4) In respect of any event specified in paragraph (2)(a)(i) or (in the case of a serious injury)
in paragraph (2)(a)(ii), notice of the event shall be given to the Secretary of State by telephone
or other immediate means of communication immediately after the event becomes known to
the generator, distributor or meter operator, as the case may be.
(5) In respect of any event specified in paragraph (2)(a) or (2)(b), notice containing the
relevant particulars shall, subject to paragraph (8), as soon as possible after the event becomes
known to the generator, distributor or meter operator, as the case may be, be given to the
Secretary of State in writing by the quickest practicable means.
(6) In respect of any event notifiable under paragraph (2)(a), (2)(c) or (2)(e), notice shall be
given to the Secretary of State by post within 15 days of the end of the month in which the event
becomes known to the generator, distributor or meter operator as the case may be, in the form
of a computer disc which—
(a) conforms to the description specified in the Department’s publication; and
(b) subject to paragraph (8), contains the information comprising the relevant
particulars, arranged in a form which complies with the technical requirements
specified in that publication.
(7) In respect of any event specified in paragraph (2)(d), notice containing the relevant
particulars shall be sent to the Secretary of State by means of a return in writing to be submitted
within one month of the end of the period of 3 months ending on 31st March, 30th June, 30th
September or 31st December (as the case may be) in which the event became known to the
generator, distributor or meter operator as the case may be.
(8) The notices required by paragraphs (5) and (6) shall, where the giver of the notice is
unable to provide full particulars, contain such of the relevant particulars as are available to
the giver of the notice at the time of giving it, and the remaining particulars shall be supplied
to the Secretary of State in writing by the quickest practicable means immediately after they
have become known.
(9) In this regulation—
“the Department’s publication” means the publication entitled (under the heading
“ELECTRICITY SAFETY, QUALITY AND CONTINUITY REGULATIONS
2002”) “COMPUTERISATION OF THE NOTIFICATION OF CERTAIN
SPECIFIED EVENTS UNDERREGULATION 31”, subtitled “SPECIFICATION OF
THE DATA FILES”, and published in September 2002 by the Department of Trade and
Industry, a copy of which was certified as such by the signature of the Minister of State
for Energy and Construction, Department of Trade and Industry;
“event” means any event of the kind specified irrespective of whether it was accidental;
“relevant particulars” means—
(i) in respect of an event specified in paragraph (2)(a), (2)(b) or (2)(d), the particulars
specified in Parts I, II and IV, respectively, of Schedule 3; and
(ii) in respect of an event specified in paragraph (2)(c) or (2)(e), the particulars
specified in Part III of Schedule 3; and
“serious injury” means any injury which results in the person injured being admitted into
hospital as an in-patient.
Notification of certain interruptions of supply
32.—(1) A distributor shall give to the Secretary of State notification in accordance with
paragraph (2) of those interruptions of supply involving his network where there has been—
(a) any single interruption of supply, to any demand of 20 megawatts or more at the time
of the interruption, for a period of three minutes or longer; or
(b) any single interruption of supply, to any demand of 5 megawatts or more at the time
of the interruption, for a period of one hour or longer; or



16
(c) any single interruption of supply to 5,000 or more consumer’s installations for a
period of one hour or longer.
(2) The notification shall—
(a) be sent in writing by the quickest practicable means immediately after the distributor
becomes aware of the interruption; and
(b) contain the particulars specified in Schedule 4.
(3) The notification given to the Secretary of State shall, where the distributor is unable to
give the full particulars required by Schedule 4, contain such of the particulars as are available
to the distributor at the time of giving the notification, and any remaining particulars shall be
sent in a supplementary notification in writing to the Secretary of State by the quickest
practicable means immediately after they have become known.
Exemption from requirements of Regulations
33.—(1) Where a request is made to the Secretary of State to grant an exemption from a
requirement of these Regulations, that request shall be made in writing and shall state the full
extent of the reasons for the exemption sought.
(2) Where the Secretary of State is satisfied that an exemption may be granted without
prejudice to safety or interference with the supply to others, the Secretary of State may grant
such an exemption as she thinks appropriate.
(3) An exemption granted under this regulation shall be for such period as the Secretary of
State shall specify when granting that exemption or, where no period is so specified, for a period
of 25 years.
Networks, equipment or installations in breach of Regulations
34.—(1) Paragraphs (2) to (10) shall apply in any case where the Secretary of State is
satisfied that—
(a) any network or any part thereof, or any equipment which is constructed, placed,
erected, maintained, or used otherwise than in accordance with these Regulations; or
(b) any part of a consumer’s installation which is not enclosed in a building; or
(c) any network or any part thereof, any part of a consumer’s installation which is not
enclosed in a building or any equipment which is in breach of any relevant exemption
or other relevant provision made under these Regulations in force at the time when
the notice referred to in paragraph (2) is served,
is or is liable to become—
(i) a source of danger to others; or
(ii) an interference with a supply to others; or
(iii) a cause of interruption of a supply to others.
(2) The Secretary of State may serve notice on the generator, distributor, meter operator or
consumer (as the case may be) specifying the matter of which she is satisfied and require that the
network, consumer’s installation, or the equipment or the part thereof specified in the notice—
(a) shall not be used; or
(b) shall be made dead; or
(c) shall be removed; or
(d) shall only be used subject to compliance with such conditions, improvements or
modifications as that notice shall specify,
within the time specified in that notice and the person on whom that notice is served shall
comply with the provisions of that notice.
(3) Where such a notice has required that any network, consumer’s installation, equipment
or the part thereof specified in the notice shall not be used or shall be made dead or shall be
removed or only used subject to compliance with conditions, improvements or modifications,
that notice shall remain in eVect until such time as the network, consumer’s installation,
equipment or the part thereof specified in the notice shall comply with these Regulations or
until the Secretary of State shall withdraw the notice.



17
(4) If, within the period specified by that notice for compliance or such longer period as the
Secretary of State may allow, the person on whom the notice is served disputes the basis for,
or the requirements of, the notice, he may give notice in writing to the Secretary of State of that
dispute and shall state the grounds.
(5) Where a notice is given to the Secretary of State pursuant to paragraph (4), the Secretary
of State shall refer the dispute to an independent person agreed between the Secretary of State
and the person giving the notice, or in default of agreement, to a person nominated by the
President for the time being of The Institution of Electrical Engineers.
(6) The person to whom a dispute is referred may decide—
(a) to uphold the notice served under paragraph (2); or
(b) to recommend to the Secretary of State that the notice be withdrawn or modified; and
shall notify his decision in writing to the Secretary of State and to the person who has given
notice under paragraph (4).
(7) The person to whom a dispute is referred may and, if so requested by any party to the
dispute, shall—
(a) give the parties to the dispute an opportunity of appearing before and being heard by
him; and
(b) make an inspection of the network, consumer’s installation, or equipment which is the
subject of the dispute.
(8) Where it appears to the person to whom a dispute is referred that any other person, not
being a party to the dispute, has an interest in the outcome of that dispute, he may at his
discretion treat that other person as if he were a party to the dispute.
(9) The person to whom a dispute is referred shall, having deliberated upon the dispute,
make a direction as to whether the person giving the notice under paragraph (4) shall bear the
costs of the reference (including any fees or expenses payable to him) or whether those costs
shall be borne by the Secretary of State.
(10) A copy of this regulation shall be endorsed upon or accompany every notice served by
the Secretary of State pursuant to this regulation.
OVences
35. Any generator, distributor, supplier, or meter operator or any agent, contractor or sub-
contractor of any of the foregoing who fails to comply with any provision of these Regulations
which applies to him, any person who fails to comply with regulation 18(3), 21, 22 or 25(1) and
any consumer who fails to comply with regulation 8(4) or 34(2) shall be liable on summary
conviction to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale.
Revocation
36. The Regulations set out in Schedule 5 are hereby revoked.
Brian Wilson,
Minister of State for Energy and Construction,
Department of Trade and Industry24th October 2002



18
SCHEDULE 1 Regulations 11(c)(i) and 19(2)
DESIGN, COLOURS AND PROPORTIONS OF THE SAFETY SIGN
1. A safety sign shall incorporate a design, and shall be of the proportions, as shown in the diagram
below, except that the height of the text may be increased to a maximum of 0.12 x L.
2. The triangle, symbol and text shall be shown in black on a yellow background.
3. The symbol shall not occupy more than 50 per cent of the area within the triangle.
4. A safety sign may include additional text but any such text—
(a) shall be in black; and
(b) shall be the same size as the text used on the safety sign,
and no part of any additional text shall appear on the sign higher than the base of the triangle.
SCHEDULE 2 Regulation 17(2)
MINIMUM HEIGHT ABOVE GROUND OF OVERHEAD LINES
Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
Nominal Voltages Over Roads Other Locations
Not exceeding 33,000 volts 5.8 metres 5.2 metres
Exceeding 33,000 volts but not exceeding 66,000 volts 6 metres 6 metres
Exceeding 66,000 volts but not exceeding 132,000 volts 6.7 metres 6.7 metres
Exceeding 132,000 volts but not exceeding 275,000 volts 7 metres 7 metres
Exceeding 275,000 volts but not exceeding 400,000 volts 7.3 metres 7.3 metres
19
SCHEDULE 3 Regulation 31(9)
NOTIFICATION OF SPECIFIED EVENTS
PART I
EVENTS SPECIFIED IN REGULATION 31(2)(a)
Particulars relating to the person submitting the notice
1. Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the notice and, if diVerent,
corresponding particulars of the person to whom enquiries should be addressed.
2. Date on which the notice is submitted.
3. Aunique and sequential reference number indicating, in respect of each year ending on 31st March,
the number of the event.
Particulars relating to the event
4. Nature of site of event, e.g. street, arable field, camp site.
5. Date and time of event.
6. Persons involved in the event, if any—
(a) if at work, type of work;
(b) if not at work, suYcient description to identify status, e.g. householder, visitor, child;
(c) age;
(d) sex; and
(e) nature of injury, if any.
7. Network details—
(a) voltage;
(b) equipment at site of event, whether overhead lines, underground cables, distributing mains, or
service lines, or if other, specify;
(c) where relevant, whether the earthing of the low voltage network is by means of protective
multiple earthing;
(d) extent of operation of circuit protection;
(e) in respect of events involving overhead lines—
(i) height of the electric line at point of contact, if any;
(ii) whether or not the electric line remained live on the ground or at a reduced height; and
(iii) whether or not the electric line was surrounded by insulation; and
(f) in respect of events not involving overhead lines—
(i) whether the equipment was situated indoors;
(ii) where a substation is involved, a brief description of substation physical security
equipment, e.g. brick building, steel doors, nature of fencing; and
(iii) whether any security fence was also the perimeter fence.
8. Brief facts of the event, including, where known, the cause.
9. Details of any action which has been, or is intended to be, taken to prevent a recurrence of the event.
PART II
EVENTS SPECIFIED IN REGULATION 31(2)(b)
Particulars relating to the person submitting the notice
1. Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the notice and, if diVerent,
corresponding particulars of the person to whom enquiries should be addressed.
2. Date on which the notice is submitted.
3. Aunique and sequential reference number indicating, in respect of each year ending on 31st March,
the number of the event.
20
Particulars relating to the event
4. Site of the event—
(a) address; and
(b) location within the premises.
5. Date of event.
6. Person involved in the event—
(a) surname and initials of the deceased person;
(b) if at work, type of work;
(c) if not at work, suYcient description to identify status, e.g. householder, visitor, child;
(d) age;
(e) sex; and
(f) nature of injury and cause of death.
7. Inquest verdict or, in Scotland, fatal accident inquiry determinations.
8. Equipment involved in the event—
(a) equipment directly involved—
(i) type and make;
(ii) whether it was faulty;
(iii) if electric blanket, whether over or under blanket; and
(iv) if radiator, whether it was guarded; and
(b) whether the death was due to a fault involving—
(i) fixed wiring;
(ii) flexible lead;
(iii) appliance lead;
(iv) appliance;
(v) plug;
(vi) socket outlet;
(vii) misuse of equipment or appliance;
(viii) bare wires;
(ix) taped joints;
(x) broken neutral conductor; or
(xi) exposed and live male plug pins.
9. Network and consumer’s installation details—
(a) voltage;
(b) earthing arrangements, whether—
(i) the earthing connection was loose;
(ii) the earthing connection was disconnected;
(iii) the earthing connection was in contact with a phase conductor in the plug, the socket, or
elsewhere, and if so, where;
(iv) the earthing connection was to a water pipe, local earth electrode, cable sheath, aerial
earthwire or earthing terminal and, if so, which;
(v) the earth fault loop impedance was measured and, if so, the measurement obtained;
(c) description of circuit protection; and
(d) extent of operation of circuit protection.
10. Whether there was evidence of amateur work.
PART III
EVENTS SPECIFIED IN REGULATION 31(2)(c) and 31(2)(e)
Particulars relating to the person submitting the notice
1. Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the notice and, if diVerent,
corresponding particulars of the person to whom enquiries should be addressed.
2. Date on which the notice is submitted.
3. Aunique and sequential reference number indicating, in respect of each year ending on 31st March,
the number of the event.
21
Particulars relating to the event
4. Nature of site of event, e.g. street, arable field, camp site.
5. Date of event.
6. Whether the person involved in the event, if any, was—
(a) at work, and, if so, the type of work;
(b) not at work, and, if so, suYcient description to identify status, e.g. householder, visitor, child.
7. Network details—
(a) voltage;
(b) equipment at site of event, whether overhead lines, underground cables, distributing mains or
service lines, or if other, specify;
(c) height of the electric line at point of contact, if any;
(d) whether or not the electric line remained live on the ground or at a reduced height;
(e) whether or not the electric line was surrounded by insulation;
(f) description of circuit protection; and
(g) extent of operation of circuit protection.
8. Brief facts of the event, including the cause where known, and details of all equipment involved and
the person responsible for the equipment.
9. Details of any action which has been, or is intended to be, taken to prevent a recurrence of the event.
PART IV
EVENTS SPECIFIED IN REGULATION 31(2)(d)
Particulars relating to the person submitting the notice
1. Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the notice and, if diVerent,
corresponding particulars of the person to whom enquiries should be addressed.
2. Date on which the notice is submitted.
3. Aunique and sequential reference number indicating, in respect of each year ending on 31st March,
the number of the event.
Particulars relating to the events
4.—(a) Total number of events, if any, during the 3 month period specified in regulation 31(7),
classified as specified in sub-paragraph (b) and as also classified as involving deliberate or accidental
contact, damage or interference by each of the following—
(i) a generator, a distributor, a telecommunication code system operator, a gas transporter, a
water or sewerage authority (in Scotland, a water and sewerage authority), a local or
highway authority (in Scotland, a local roads authority or a roads authority), or their
respective contractors;
(ii) farmers, farm workers or farm implements;
(iii) private individuals;
(iv) other persons; and
(v) other causes, e.g. corrosion, ground subsidence, faulty manufacture, ageing or
deterioration.
(b) The classes referred to in sub-paragraph (a) are—
(i) low voltage service lines;
(ii) low voltage distributing mains; and
(iii) high voltage electric lines (specifying voltage).
22
SCHEDULE 4 Regulation 32(2)
NOTIFICATION OF CERTAIN INTERRUPTIONS OF SUPPLY
Particulars relating to the person submitting the notification
1. Name, address and telephone number of the person submitting the notification and, if diVerent,
corresponding particulars of the person to whom enquiries should be addressed.
2. Date on which the notification is submitted.
Particulars relating to the interruption of supply
3. Date and time of the interruption.
4. Duration of the interruption.
5. Approximate load aVected (in megawatts).
6. Number of consumers aVected approximated to the nearest 100.
7. Geographical area aVected.
8. Nature and cause of the interruption.
9. Nature of any deliberate damage involved.
10. Voltage of equipment involved.
11. Type of equipment involved.
SCHEDULE 5 Regulation 36
REVOCATIONS
Regulations revoked References
The Electricity Supply Regulations 1988 S.I. 1988/1057
The Electricity Supply (Amendment) Regulations 1990 S.I. 1990/390
The Electricity Supply (Amendment) Regulations 1992 S.I. 1992/2961
The Electricity Supply (Amendment) Regulations 1994 S.I. 1994/533
The Electricity Supply (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 1994 S.I. 1994/3021
The Electricity Supply (Amendment) Regulations 1998 S.I. 1998/2971
23
EXPLANATORY NOTE
(This note is not part of the Regulations)
These Regulations replace the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988 (S.I. 1988/1057) and all
subsequent amendments (S.I. 1990/390, S.I. 1992/2961, S.I. 1994/533, S.I. 1994/3021 and S.I.
1998/2971).
These Regulations impose requirements regarding the installation and use of electrical
networks and equipment owned or operated by generators, distributors (which include, in these
Regulations, transmitters), and meter operators, and the participation of suppliers in providing
electricity to consumers (all such persons are collectively referred to as “duty holders” in this
note). Agents, contractors and sub-contractors of duty holders also have duties under these
Regulations. These Regulations were notified in draft to the European Commission in
accordance with Council Directive 98/34/EC (O.J. No. L 204, 21.7.1998, p. 37) as amended by
Council Directive 98/48/EC (O.J. No. L 217, 5.8.1998, p. 18).
A regulatory impact assessment is available and can be obtained from the Engineering
Inspectorate, Department of Trade and Industry, 1 Victoria Street, London SW1H OET. The
Department’s publication referred to in regulation 31(9) can be obtained from the same
address. Copies of the regulatory impact assessment have been placed in the libraries of both
Houses of Parliament.
The British Standard Requirements referred to in regulation 1(5) is a joint publication by the
British Standards Institution and The Institution of Electrical Engineers. Copies can be
obtained from The Institution of Electrical Engineers, P.O. Box 96, Stevenage, United
Kingdom SGI 2SD.
Part I (regulations 1-5) contains introductory provisions. Regulation 1 contains defined
terms; because these Regulations are targeted at technical and safety requirements, some of the
defined terms have a diVerent meaning from those used in the Electricity Act 1989 and in the
Utilities Act 2000. Regulation 2 contains time limited exemptions for continued use of old
equipment not complying with the requirements of the Regulations (e.g. pre-1937 cut-outs) and
for the phased introduction of several new requirements (e.g. risk assessment of substations).
Regulation 3 contains general duties relating to the safe use and operation of equipment, and
requires risk registers to be maintained for substations and overhead lines. Regulation 4
requires duty holders to co-operate as necessary in order that they may each comply with these
Regulations. Regulation 5 imposes requirements on duty holders to inspect their equipment
and to maintain certain records for at least 10 years.
Part II (regulations 6-10) contains provisions relating to electrical protection and earthing.
Regulation 6 imposes a requirement for generators and distributors to install adequate
protective devices in their networks. Regulation 7 requires generators and distributors to ensure
continuity of the supply neutral conductor. Regulation 8 imposes certain requirements for
connections with earth for all systems, and also for high voltage networks and for low voltage
networks in particular. Regulation 9 contains requirements for distributors operating
protective multiple earthing systems, including the circumstances in which earthing terminals
of consumers’ installations should not be connected to the distributor’s combined neutral and
protective conductor. Regulation 10 contains requirements for earthing of metalwork.
Part III (regulation 11) contains provisions relating to substations, specifically requirements
for enclosures, safety and other signs (see Schedule 1), and fire precautions.
Part IV (regulations 12-15) contains provisions relating to underground cables and
associated equipment. Regulation 12 imposes restrictions on the use of underground cables.
Regulation 13 imposes requirements for mechanical protection of such equipment and
regulation 14 contains requirements regarding the depth and manner of installation.
Regulation 15 requires generators and distributors to maintain maps of underground cables
and equipment and to permit inspection by, and to provide copies to, specified persons.
Part V (regulations 16-20) contains provisions relating to overhead lines. Regulation 16
specifies the equipment aVected by this Part and imposes a limit on nominal voltage. Regulation
17 imposes minimum heights for overhead electric lines and other cables (with further
requirements in Schedule 2). Regulation 18 contains requirements relating to insulation and
24
protection of such lines. Regulation 19 imposes requirements to prevent access to high voltage
overhead conductors and to fix safety signs to supports for overhead lines (see Schedule 1).
Regulation 20 relates to stay wires for supports carrying overhead lines.
Part VI (regulations 21 and 22) contains provisions relating to generation. Regulation 21
requires persons to ensure switched alternative sources of energy remain isolated from a
distributor’s network. Regulation 22 imposes requirements on persons intending to operate a
source of energy in parallel with a distributor’s network.
Part VII (regulations 23-29) contains general requirements relating to the provision of
electricity to consumers’ installations and other networks. Regulation 23 requires distributors
to take precautions against supply failure. Regulation 24 contains provisions relating to
distributors’ and meter operators’ equipment on consumers’ premises, including electrical
protection, security and connections to consumers’ earthing terminals. Regulation 25 specifies
requirements for persons connecting new installations or new networks to a distributor’s
network, with provision for settling disputes arising from a distributor’s delay in giving or
refusal to give consent for connections. Regulation 26 specifies the procedure if a distributor
considers that an installation is unsafe or is causing interference and the procedure to challenge
the distributor’s refusal to give or continue a supply. Regulation 27 imposes requirements to
give information relating to a supply and to maintain the quality of supply within certain
tolerance limits. Regulation 28 requires other information aVecting a consumer to be provided
on request. Regulation 29 permits distributors to discontinue a supply for such period as may
be necessary under certain circumstances.
Part VIII (regulations 30-36) contains miscellaneous provisions. Regulation 30 entitles
inspectors appointed by the Secretary of State to the provision of facilities and information
where an inspection of a generator’s or distributor’s network or equipment is being carried out.
Regulation 31 and Schedule 3 contain a requirement on generators, distributors and meter
operators to give particulars to the Secretary of State relating to accidents and other events
involving their networks and equipment and domestic consumers’ installations. Regulation 32
and Schedule 4 contain a requirement on a distributor to give notice to the Secretary of State
of specified interruptions of supply to consumers. Regulation 33 permits the Secretary of State
to grant exemptions from the Regulations, and regulation 34 enables the Secretary of State to
prohibit the use of networks or equipment owned or operated by duty holders or of a
consumer’s installation in specified circumstances, with provision for settling disputes.
Regulation 35 provides that specified persons who fail to comply with specified provisions of
the Regulations commit an oVence under section 29 of the Electricity Act 1989. Regulation 36
and Schedule 5 specify Regulations (the Electricity Supply Regulations 1988 and subsequent
amendments) which are revoked by these Regulations.
25
£4.50
STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS
2002 No. 2665
ELECTRICITY
The Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity
Regulations 2002
? Crown copyright 2002
Printed and published in the UK by The Stationery OYce Limited
under the authority and superintendence of Carol Tullo, Controller of
Her Majesty’s Stationery OYce and Queen’s Printer of Acts of Parliament.
E1431 10/2002 121431 19585
ISBN 0-11-042920-6
9 780110 429205

Electrical safety

Written by Admin. Posted in Electrical regulations

Health and Safety Executive

Electrical safety and you a brief guide

Introduction

Electricity can kill or severely injure people and cause damage to property. Every year many accidents at work involving electric shock or burns are reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Most of the fatal incidents are caused by contact with overhead power lines.

Even non-fatal shocks can cause severe and permanent injury. For example, shocks from faulty equipment may lead to falls from ladders, scaffolds or other work platforms.

This is a web-friendly version of leaflet INDG231(rev1), published 04/12

Those using or working with electricity may not be the only ones at risk – poor electrical installations and faulty electrical appliances can lead to fire, which may also cause death or injury to others. Most of these accidents can be avoided by careful planning and straightforward precautions.

This leaflet provides some basic measures to help you control the risks from your use of electricity at work. Further guidance for particular industries or subjects can be found on HSE's website (www.hse.gov.uk).

What are the hazards?

The main hazards are:

  •  contact with live parts causing shock and burns – normal mains voltage, 230 volts AC, can kill;
  • faults which could cause fire; and
  • fire or explosion where electricity could be the source of ignition in a potentially flammable or explosive atmosphere.

Assessing the risk

Your health and safety risk assessment should take into account the risks associated with electricity. It will help you decide what action you need to take to use and maintain your electrical installations and equipment and also how often maintenance is needed. See HSE's website for further guidance (www.hse.gov. uk/risk).

The risk of injury from electricity is strongly linked to where and how it is used. The risks are greatest in harsh conditions, for example:

 In wet surroundings – unsuitable equipment can easily become live and can make its surroundings live;

outdoors – equipment may not only become wet but may be at greater risk of damage; and in cramped spaces with a lot of earthed metalwork such as inside a tank – if an electrical fault developed it could be very difficult to avoid a shock.

Page 1 of 6

Some items of equipment can also involve greater risk than others. Extension leads are particularly liable to damage – to their plugs, sockets, connections and the cable itself. Other flexible leads, particularly those connected to equipment which is often moved, can suffer from similar problems.

Reducing the risk

Once you have completed the risk assessment, you can use your findings to reduce unacceptable risks from the electrical equipment in your workplace. There are many things you can do to achieve this, and some of them are listed below.

Ensure people working on or with your electrical equipment or systems are
'competent' for the task
Competent means having suitable training, skill, and knowledge for the task to prevent injury to themselves and others.

Ensure the electrical installation is safe
Make sure that:

  •  new electrical systems are installed to a suitable standard, eg BS 7671Requirements for electrical installations,1 and then maintain them in a safe condition;
  • existing installations are maintained in a safe condition; and you provide enough socket outlets because overloading socket outlets by using adaptors can cause fire.

Provide safe and suitable equipment

  • Choose equipment that is suitable for its working environment.
  • Electrical risks can sometimes be eliminated by using air, hydraulic or hand- powered tools which are especially useful in harsh conditions.
  • Make sure that equipment is safe when supplied and that it is then maintained in a safe condition.
  • Provide an accessible and clearly identified switch near each fixed machine to cut off power in an emergency.
  • For portable equipment, use socket outlets which are close by so that equipment can be easily disconnected in an emergency.
  • The ends of flexible cables should always have the outer sheath of the cable firmly clamped to stop the wires (particularly the earth) pulling out of the terminals.
  • Replace damaged sections of cable completely.
  • Use proper connectors or cable couplers to join lengths of cable. Do not use strip connector blocks covered in insulating tape.
  • Some types of equipment are double insulated. These are often marked with a 'double-square' symbol .The supply leads have only two wires – live (brown) and neutral (blue). Make sure they are properly connected if the plug is not moulded.
  • Protect light bulbs and other equipment which could easily be damaged in use.
  • In potentially flammable or explosive atmospheres, only special electrical equipment designed for these areas should be used. You may need specialist advice.

Reduce the voltage

One of the best ways of reducing the risk of injury when using electrical equipment is to limit the supply voltage to the lowest needed to get the job done, such as:

  • temporary lighting can be run at lower voltages, eg 12, 25, 50 or
  • 110 volts; where electrically powered tools are used, battery-operated ones are safest; or portable tools designed to be run from a 110 volt centre-tapped-to-earth supply are readily available.

Provide a safety device

If equipment operating at 230 volts or higher is used, an RCD (residual current device) can provide additional safety. An RCD is a device which detects some, but not all, faults in the electrical system and rapidly switches off the supply.

The best place for an RCD is built into the main switchboard or the socket outlet, as this means that the supply cables are permanently protected. If this is not possible, a plug incorporating an RCD or a plug-in RCD adaptor can also provide additional safety.

  • RCDs for protecting people have a rated tripping current (sensitivity) of not more than 30 milliamps (mA).
  • Remember: an RCD is a valuable safety device, never bypass it;if it trips, it is a sign there is a fault – check the system before using it again
  • If it trips frequently and no fault can be found in the system, consult the manufacturer of the RCD; and the RCD has a test button to check that its mechanism is free and functioning you should use this regularly.

Carry out preventative maintenance


All electrical equipment, including portable equipment and installations, should be maintained (so far as is reasonably practicable) to prevent danger; this is a requirement of the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.

What does 'so far as is reasonably practicable' mean?
This means balancing the level of risk against the measures needed to control the risk in terms of money, time or trouble.

These Regulations state principles of electrical safety and apply to all electrical systems and equipment. However, they do not specify what needs to be done, by whom or how frequently.

Decisions on maintenance levels and the frequency of checks should be made in consultation with equipment users, based on the risk of electrical items becoming faulty. There is an increased risk of this happening if the equipment isn't used correctly, isn't suitable for the job, or is used in a harsh environment.

An appropriate system of maintenance is strongly recommended. This can include:

  • user checks by employees, eg a pre-use check for loose cables or signs of fire
  • damage; a visual inspection by someone with more knowledge, eg checking inside the plug for internal damage, bare wires and the correct fuse; and
  • where necessary, a portable appliance test (PAT) by someone with the necessary knowledge and experience to carry out a test and interpret the results.

Damaged or defective equipment should be removed from use and either repaired by someone competent or disposed of to prevent its further use.

Not every electrical item needs a PAT and those that do may not need to be tested every year

By concentrating on a simple, inexpensive system of looking for visible signs of damage or faults, most of the electrical risks can be controlled.

There is no legal requirement to label equipment that has been inspected or tested, nor is there a requirement to keep records of these activities.

Although it is not a legal requirement, maintaining a record and labelling system can be a useful way to monitor and review the effectiveness of the maintenance scheme.

Guidance on portable appliance testing, including the frequency of checks, is available in the booklets mentioned later and in the frequently asked questions at www.hse.gov.uk/electricity.

It is recommended that fixed installations (the wiring and equipment between the supply meter and the point of use, eg socket outlets) are inspected and tested periodically by a competent person.

Work safely
Make sure that people who are working with electricity are competent to do the job. Even simple tasks such as wiring a plug can lead to danger – ensure that people know what they are doing before they start.

Check that:

n suspect or faulty equipment is taken out of use, labelled 'DO NOT USE' and kept secure until examined by a competent person;
n where possible, tools and power socket outlets are switched off before plugging in or unplugging; and
n equipment is switched off and/or unplugged before cleaning or making adjustments.

More complicated tasks, such as equipment repairs or alterations to an electrical installation, should only be carried out by people with knowledge of the risks and the precautions needed.

You must not allow work on or near exposed, live parts of equipment unless it is absolutely unavoidable and suitable precautions have been taken to prevent injury, both to the workers and to anyone else who may be in the area.

Underground power cables
Always assume cables will be present when digging in the street, pavement or near buildings. Use up-to-date service plans, cable avoidance tools and safe digging practice to avoid danger.

Service plans should be available from regional electricity companies, local authorities, highways authorities etc. More detailed guidance is available in HSE publication Avoiding danger from underground services (HSG47).2

Overhead power lines
Over half of the fatal electrical accidents each year are caused by contact with overhead lines.

When working near overhead lines, it may be possible to have them switched off if the owners are given enough notice. If this cannot be done, consult the owners about the safe working distance from the cables.

Remember that electricity can flash over from overhead lines even though plant and equipment do not touch them. More detailed guidance is available in HSE publication Avoidance of danger from overhead electric power lines (GS6).3

Electrified railways and tramways
If you are working near electrified railways or tramways, consult the line or track operating company. Remember that some railways and tramways use electrified rails rather than overhead cables.

The regulation of health and safety on railways and tramways was transferred to the Office of Rail Regulation in April 2006 and some guidance is available on their website (www.rail-reg.gov.uk). The guidance in Avoidance of danger from overhead electric power lines (GS6)3 is also relevant.

References

1 BS 7671:2008 (2011) Requirements for electrical installations British Standards Institution 2011 ISBN 978 1 84919 269 9 (Also known as IET Wiring Regulations 17th edition)

2 Avoiding danger from underground services HSG47 (Second edition) HSE Books 2000 ISBN 978 0 7176 1744 9 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg47.htm

3 Avoidance of danger from overhead electric power lines General Guidance Note GS6 (Third edition) HSE Books 1997 ISBN 978 0 7176 1348 9 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/gs6.htm

Further reading

Health and safety made simple: The basics for your business Leaflet INDG449
HSE Books 2011 (priced packs ISBN 978 0 7176 6448 1)
www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg449.htm

Maintaining portable and transportable electrical equipment HSG107 (Second edition) HSE Books 2004 ISBN 978 0 7176 2805 6 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg107.htm

Maintaining portable electrical equipment in low-risk environments INDG236(rev2) HSE Books 2012 (priced pack ISBN 978 0 7176 6508 2) www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg236.htm

Electricity at work: Safe working practices HSG85 (Second edition) HSE Books
2003 ISBN 978 0 7176 2164 4 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg85.htm

Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations HSR25 (Second edition) HSE Books 2007
ISBN 978 0 7176 6228 9 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsr25.htm

HSE's 'Electrical safety at work' site: www.hse.gov.uk/electricity

Further information

For information about health and safety, or to report inconsistencies or inaccuracies in this guidance, visit www.hse.gov.uk/. You can view HSE guidance online and order priced publications from the website. HSE priced publications are also available from bookshops.

This leaflet contains notes on good practice which are not compulsory but which you may find helpful in considering what you need to do.

This leaflet is available in priced packs from HSE Books, ISBN 978 0 7176 6476 4.
A web version can be found at: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg231.pdf.

© Crown copyright If you wish to reuse this information visit www.hse.gov.uk/
copyright.htm for details. First published 04/12.